Revised 2018–19 Corporate Plan

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The Department of Communications and the Arts revised 2018–19 Corporate Plan is prepared for section 35(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, for the 2018–19 reporting period. It covers the period from 2018–19 to 2021–22.

 

Secretary's statement

I am pleased to present a revised issue of the Department of Communications and the Arts 2018–19 Corporate Plan.

This revised plan incorporates new impact-oriented performance measures, informed by the needs we are meeting and what success against our purposes looks like for Australians. We'll report results against these measures in our 2018–19 annual report.

The Australian Government's policy, regulatory and program settings for communications and the arts have a significant influence on enabling economic and social activity, particularly as Australia is an increasingly digital economy. A range of services, across diverse sectors, are now predominantly delivered via digital platforms enabled by communications infrastructure.

Our purposes—connectivity, creativity and culture—are at the centre of our work plan. Our nation's communications, creative and cultural sectors are interdependent and complementary. We promote an innovative and competitive communications sector so that new communications technologies can not only enable business and government service transformation, but can also provide new ways to access Australia's social, creative and cultural products. Demand for digital content, in particular creative and cultural content, is a significant driver of the rapid changes we are experiencing in communications technology. In an increasingly global marketplace for creativity, our work to protect and promote Australian, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, content and culture supports national growth and makes a significant difference to social inclusiveness.

Over the life of this 4-year corporate plan, the NBN rollout will be completed, 5G mobile technology introduced and high levels of investment in communications infrastructure will continue. Together, these will provide a powerful platform to allow more data to be transferred more widely, quickly and reliably than ever before. This has opened up the potential for wider-scale process automation, always-on interconnection between millions of devices, and complex interactions being handled through technology alone.

Our role in this complex environment is to develop the policy, regulatory and support structures to ensure that sectors can invest confidently, operate effectively, consumers can connect and are appropriately protected, and creative and cultural objectives are achieved.

As we work to implement this plan, we will be guided by our strategic vision: to be the pre-eminent national entity for communications policy, planning, investment and research; to be an effective and accountable leader on telecommunications, broadcasting and digital regulation; to foster and promote Australian content and creativity domestically and abroad on a variety of platforms; to have a view on the right outcome; to be outstanding program managers; and to foster an inclusive, high-performing workplace.

Mike Mrdak AO
Secretary

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Role and purposes

Our role is to provide an environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from communications services, creative experiences and culture.

 

Our purposes are:

Connectivity

Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services and technologies, for inclusiveness and sustainable economic growth.

Creativity and culture

Supporting inclusiveness and growth in Australia's creative sector, and protecting and promoting Australian content and culture.

We carry out our role and deliver our purposes through 2 budget programs (activities).

Program 1.1 Digital Technologies and Communications Services

Through program 1.1, we provide high-quality, strategic advice to the government on communications infrastructure and markets, consumer protections and regulatory reform opportunities and deliver related programs and services.

Program 2.1 Arts and Cultural Development

Through program 2.1, we administer a range of activities to: support excellence in the arts and culture; develop and promote access to cultural activities including in regional and remote Australia; preserve and develop Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts and culture; support Australian screen production; and protect Australia's movable cultural heritage

Sustainable development goals

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development apply to all nations. To implement the agenda, governments worldwide are expected to take ownership and establish national frameworks for the achievement of 17 identified sustainable development goals and mobilise their efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind.

We are a supporting agency for:

  • Goal 9 Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation
  • Goal 11 Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

In terms of these goals, Australia has long-standing arrangements to provide universal access to telephony, and has encouraged the development and uptake of the internet and high speed broadband. The NBN will provide all Australian premises with access to affordable, high-speed next-generation broadband by 2020, enhancing connectivity and with particular benefits for regional, rural and remote regions. In light of the NBN's rollout, the government is developing options for a new universal service guarantee to provide all Australian premises, regardless of location, with access to both voice and broadband services, better reflecting consumer needs. Our Mobile Black Spot Program, in partnership with mobile network operators, state and territory and local governments, is improving mobile coverage and competition in telecommunications across Australia in areas where commercial investment alone is not sustainable.

Australia is home to diverse creative arts and cultures. Our vibrant creative and cultural sector contributes to fostering inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and innovative cities and human settlements. Creativity is key to innovation, driving sustainability and prosperity. We support a broad range of activities that encourage a sustainable, innovative creative sector and the protection, preservation and promotion of Australian culture.

How we will achieve our purposes, and measure achievement

We provide an environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from communications services, creative experiences and culture. We do this through delivering:

  • strategic advice and policy development—providing government with the best options and policy advice on issues relating to communications and the arts, including on the delivery of services to regional Australia. Our advice is evidence-based and is informed by research, stakeholder consultation and critical analysis of sectoral developments and market trends
  • effective program and grants management—delivering efficient and effective programs, grants and services to achieve the government's policy outcomes. We adhere to the highest standards of public administration
  • regulatory management—administering portfolio legislation efficiently and effectively. We review and shape regulatory frameworks and we assist the Minister for Communications and the Arts, and the Minister for Regional Services to fulfil their parliamentary obligations
  • collaborative stakeholder engagement—working with portfolio entities, government stakeholders, international organisations, industry, research institutions and the community to generate innovative advice and ensure that the advice and services the department delivers are effective and meet the needs of the community. We engage proactively with our stakeholders with a clear understanding of their issues and challenges and we value diverse perspectives and ideas. Given the global nature of our portfolio's remit, we also engage extensively across other jurisdictions

We recognise that the achievement of our purposes is not solely our responsibility. Industry, consumer bodies and other government entities, including our portfolio entities, all have important contributions to make.

For each purpose, we have developed a small number of performance measures, which we will use to assess our performance in achieving our purposes over the next 4 years and to prepare our annual performance statements.

  • Results against effectiveness measures will show whether the needs we are addressing through our purposes are being met and whether we, and our partners, are making a difference to the right people.
  • Program resourcing (input), output and efficiency measures complement effectiveness measures. Results against these types of measures support us in monitoring our output and in improving delivery and resource allocation over time.

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Connectivity

Operating environment

Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services and technologies, for inclusiveness and sustainable economic growth.

 

Demand for communications is increasing, in an environment of rapid technological change

Connecting to communications services is increasingly necessary for people to participate in our economy, society, education and democracy. Supporting the market to deliver access to effective communications—post, telephone, internet, mobile—has been a constant of Commonwealth policy. In particular, we have a long-standing Telecommunications Universal Service Obligation in place for telephone services, and Australia Post has long delivered against community service obligations. However, expectations are changing as technology rapidly evolves and as delivery faces new challenges.

Reflecting the economy's digital transformation, demand for communications goods and services is growing faster than that for other goods and services in the economy. In terms of household appetite for data, it's forecast to jump from 95 gigabytes a month in 2016 to around 420 gigabytes a month by 2026.

In this environment, it's critical that our role includes ensuring inclusive access for consumers to quality, affordable communications services, supported by modern infrastructure, technology and digital platforms. Our regulatory settings must maintain a safe digital environment for Australians and must also continue to provide the right incentives to support growth and investment in communications infrastructure, to remove barriers to innovation and to be sufficiently flexible to adapt to rapidly changing market conditions. We monitor complaints for insight into the effectiveness of Australia's communications services.

Improvements to telecommunications are disrupting traditional business models

The National Broadband Network (NBN) is significantly changing the telecommunications market by progressively making fast broadband access available to all Australian premises. After the NBN rollout is completed in 2020, Australia will be the only continent where every household and business has access to affordable high speed broadband services. Minimum peak wholesale speeds will be at least 25 megabits per second (mbps). This change will give industry and businesses the opportunity to harness significant productivity benefits, as well as to innovate and develop new products and services. It will also continue the trend of Australians having flexibility to digitally manage aspects of life and work in different ways.

Australians are already amongst the world's most prolific users of mobile services and we have a highly competitive, high quality industry. Our policy and regulatory settings support mobile services availability to more than 99% of our population, including with our Mobile Black Spot Program focusing on extending mobile coverage to areas that are not otherwise commercially viable. Increased connectivity and capacity provided through fixed and mobile networks is contributing to the disruption of traditional business models, in particular traditional broadcasting activities (including television and radio), and models of work, changing social communication and how Australians experience culture.

The digital economy is also having a profound impact on the postal sector, leading to a significant decline in letters, while the parcels and logistics sectors are transforming and growing rapidly to support e-commerce.

Spectrum is more and more important

Spectrum is a valuable input in enabling the digital economy, and efficient allocation is essential to move spectrum to its highest value use. Spectrum is required to enable 5G mobile services which will support machine-to-machine, internet of things and smart city applications.

Addressing safety and consumer protection supports social inclusion

Security, safety and consumer protections have also become higher priorities for the communications sector. Addressing these priorities protects consumers from harm (including harmful content), and is important to social inclusion, but to do so is not without challenges. Responding to threats requires us to stay one step ahead of rival interests and to coordinate across government activities.

Performance measures, targets and assessments

We are supporting the market to deliver Australians access to quality communications services, including in regional, rural and remote areas.

Effectiveness measures: enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications service (access)

This table includes measure numbers 1, 2 and 3. The measures are effectiveness measures grouped under the topic, ‘Enabling all Australians to connect to Effective communications (Access)’. This table includes measure numbers 4 and 5. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Enabling all Australians to connect to Effective communications (Access)’.
Measure 1 is the percentage of Universal Service Obligation targets met by Telstra and Community Service Obligations met by Australia Post:
•	the previous result against this measure was 100% in 2017–18
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is 100% in 2018–19
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are 100% 
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “we have budgeted $1.080 billion from 2018–19 to 2021–22 to pay for the Universal Service Obligation, ensuring all Australians, wherever they live or work, have access to voice-only standard telephone services and payphones; while Australia Post’s community service obligations are set in legislation and include guarantees for letter services that meet the social, industrial and commercial needs of our country. We oversee Australia Post as one of our portfolio entities.”
Measure 2 is the percentage of the population with access to mobile coverage:
•	the previous result against this measure was 99% in 2017–18
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is to maintain ≥99% in 2018–19
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are that coverage is maintained in forward years 
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our budget includes funding to deliver the Mobile Black Spot Program, which will improve mobile phone coverage and competition in regional and remote Australia.
Measure 3 is the percentage of premises with high-speed broadband access (ready to connect):
•	the previous result against this measure was 60% of 11.7 million premises were ready to connect to the NBN by 30 June 2018
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is ≥80% ready to connect to the NBN by 30 June 2019 (including ≥90% in regional areas)
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are that 100% of premises ready to connect to high speed broadband services by 30 June 2020, and after that time 100% access is maintained
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “NBN Co is rolling out high-speed broadband services across Australia. We oversee NBN Co as one our portfolio entities, and manage ongoing public investment in the company.”
This table includes measure numbers 4 and 5. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Enabling all Australians to connect to Effective communications (Access)’.  
Measure 4 is the minimum fixed broadband download speeds available to Australian premises:
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	there is no 2018–19 target for this measure as first results are not expected until 2020
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are divided into a target for premises served through NBN Co and premises served through other Statutory Infrastructure Providers:
o	The target for premises served through NBN Co is that, when completed in June 2020, the NBN is expected to offer at least 25 megabits per second (Mbps) peak wholesale speeds to every premises, and at least 50Mbps peak wholesale speeds to 90% of premises in the fixed line footprint, except for premises still in the co-existence period.
o	The target for premises served through other Statutory Infrastructure Providers is that Statutory Infrastructure Providers provide a minimum standard of broadband (including at least 25Mbps peak wholesale speeds) to every premises in Australia on reasonable request from a retail provider.
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Requiring minimum broadband speeds be available to all Australian premises enables everyone to benefit from high speed internet services. We are also developing a new Universal Service Guarantee for the future that will guarantee access to broadband services for all Australians, wherever they live or work.”
Measure 5 is an assessment of telecommunications and postal services complaints data. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider whether positive results have been achieved with respect to trends in complaints to industry, complaints escalated to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman and complaints escalated to the Postal Industry Ombudsman.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Complaints data gives valuable insight into the effectiveness of Australia’s postal and telecommunications services”.

 

Inclusiveness means all Australians can benefit from connectivity, including people with a disability and people in low-income households. Also important are effective community safeguards to inform and protect digital consumers.

Effectiveness measures: inclusiveness

This table includes measure numbers 6 and 7 and 8. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Inclusiveness’.  
Measure 6 is an assessment of the affordability of telecommunications services (mobile and fixed) on offer. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider the affordability indexes we are tracking in our Bureau of Communications and Arts Research, and reporting by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC). The ACCC provides a report on telecommunications to the minister annually.
•	the previous result against this measure was that affordability improved in aggregate and for most vulnerable groups between 2006 and 2015. Consumers are getting better value as prices stay the same or fall, while product inclusions increase.
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for price changes for typical mobile and fixed bundles over 2018–19 to show positive results
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for price changes for typical mobile and fixed bundles to show positive results
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Communications services are increasingly essential for accessing information, employment, markets and key services; and demand in recent years has grown rapidly. We work with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to help ensure communications markets are competitive and able to provide affordable services, including for vulnerable groups.”
Measure 7 is the impact of our programs on improving connectivity for people with a disability. A footnote explains that our impact will be determined by assessing: relay service provider services levels; reporting by free to-air television broadcasters on captioning compliance; and progress towards audio description for Australian television.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is to maintain or increase impact in 2018–19
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to maintain or increase impact over time
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our work to improve connectivity for people with a disability includes delivering the National Relay Service which helps deaf, hearing and/or speech-impaired people to make and receive phone calls. We also set policy for captioning regulation for broadcasting services and are developing options for the implementation of audio description for people who are blind or vision impaired.”
Measure 8 is an assessment of effectiveness of the digital safety regulatory framework. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider: spending by Australians on illegal offshore gambling websites; breaches of rules for gambling promotions during live sporting events; data from the Office of the eSafety Commissioner; and results from the National Online Safety Survey.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our work to improve digital safety includes advising on a range of online safety and online gambling policy issues, administering the  Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015 and the Interactive Gambling Act 2001 and providing policy oversight of the eSafety Commissioner.”

 

Our policy settings support economic growth by enabling the communications sector to invest and innovate, compete internationally and meet consumer needs.

Effectiveness measures: sustainable economic growth

This table includes measure numbers 9 and 10 and 11 and 12. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Sustainable economic growth’.
Measure 9 is the percentage of ready to connect premises that have taken up NBN.
•	the previous result against this measure was 57% at 30 June 2018
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is ≥56% at 30 June 2019
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to increase take up in forward years, to ≥73% by 31 December 2021
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “A large number of premises will become ready to connect to NBN in 2018–19. Through take-up, consumers are unlocking the economic benefits of the NBN.”
Measure 10 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the department’s international engagement on post and spectrum outcomes. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider the impact of decisions made at meetings of the Universal Postal Union and the International Telecommunications Union.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “We represent Australia at meetings of the Universal Postal Union (UPU) and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). The UPU sets rules for international mail and the ITU is responsible for information and communication technologies, including allocating global radio spectrum. The work we do through these forums is integral to Australia’s communications framework, particularly to staying competitive in a global market.”
This table includes measure numbers 11 and 12. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Sustainable economic growth’.
Measure 11 is GDP contribution enabled by the communications sector 
•	the previous result against this measure was  $730 billion in 2016–17
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is ≥$730 billion in 2017–18 (a note explains that 2017–18 data is expected to be the most current available for 2018–19 reporting)
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to maintain or increase GDP contribution over time
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “The communications sector is a critical enabler of economic activity. Although its direct contribution to the economy and employment is relatively small, the sector exerts a substantial influence on other sectors as an enabler of economic activity and progress. This measure demonstrates whether we are providing an environment with the right policy and regulatory settings to support the sector to enable economic growth and benefit Australia’s economy.”
Measure 12 is investment as a proportion of output in the communications sector:
•	the previous result against this measure was 33% in 2016–17
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is ≥33% in 2017–18
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are ≥33% in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our policy settings need to encourage confidence in the communications sector, to enable businesses and industry to invest in and build critical communications infrastructure. Investment is key to unlocking economic growth as technologies continue to develop and improve, including with the introduction of 5G mobile technology and the delivery of other new communications infrastructure”.

 

Program resourcing (input), output and efficiency measures

This table includes measure numbers 13, 14 and 15. The measures are program resourcing (input), output and efficiency measures.

Measure 13 is Expenses for digital technologies and communications services (program 1.1). A footnote explains that program 1.1 includes funding for the 2 national broadcasters (the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the Special Broadcasting Services Corporation). Funding the work of the broadcasters is also relevant to achieving the creativity and culture purpose. We have budgeted $1.328 billion in 2018–19 for the broadcasters through program 1.1.
•	the previous result against this measure was $1.906 billion in 2017–18 (0.65% less than budgeted)
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for 2018–19 expenses to be within 5% of published budget figures
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for expenses in forward years to be within 5% of published budget figures
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Budget figures are forecast in the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and, if required, updated in the Mid Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) and Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (PAES).”
Measure 14 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the department’s oversight of communications portfolio entities. A footnote explains that communications portfolio entities are: the Australian Postal Corporation (Australia Post); the Australian Communications and Media Authority; NBN Co; and the 2 national broadcasters.
•	the previous result against this measure was that the department was effective in 2017–18
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for the department to be effective in 2018–19. A footnote explains that we determine whether we are providing effective oversight of our portfolio entities by assessing whether we have undertaken oversight appropriate to each entity. Our oversight activities for a given entity may include providing advice on corporate planning and annual reporting, advising our Minister on matters such as board appointments and monitoring entity performance against government objectives.
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are that the department is effective in forward years
Measure 15 is an assessment of whether program 1.1 administered items are delivered efficiently:
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for administered items to be delivered on time and on budget in 2018–19, indicating efficient delivery
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for administered items to continue to be administered on time and on budget, indicating efficient delivery.

 

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Creativity and culture

Supporting inclusiveness and growth in Australia's creative sector, and protecting and promoting Australian content and culture

Our creative and cultural sectors enrich the lives of Australians and keep our economy strong

Australia's creative and cultural sectors are already prominent in the economy and their contribution is expected to grow further in coming years. Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that in 2016–17 cultural and creative activity added approximately $111.7 billion to Australia's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), equivalent to over 6%. The data also shows that from 2008–09 to 2016–17 there has been substantial employment growth in the sectors—nearly twice the rate of the total Australian workforce.

Our national cultural institutions play an important role in preserving and providing access to Australia's cultural heritage and are vital to Australia's innovation agenda.

The broadcasting sector is also integral to a thriving creative economy. Broadcasters are an important source of quality news journalism, content diversity and Australian content in a converged, digital environment of almost limitless choice and multiple delivery systems, and a key mechanism for achieving cultural policy objectives. They will be an important means by which Australian audiences can find, see and hear quality Australian content, and are the connection between the creators of Australian content and a mass audience.

Our focus is on contributing to the broader Australian Government agenda of encouraging productivity, growth, inclusiveness and innovation, through supporting the links between innovation, arts and creativity. This creates a modern regime to enable creators to have the confidence to produce world-quality Australian products. One important way we are promoting creativity, cultural works and economic activity is through a balanced copyright framework.

Australians are highly engaged with the arts

Creativity and cultural experiences contributes to a cohesive Australian society and are essential to our national identity and prosperity. Approximately 98% of Australians engage with the arts, and we promote inclusive access, appropriate protections and the sustainability, diversity and recognition of the sector. This includes: regulating classification for screen content; delivering grant programs which support creative industries, Indigenous arts and culture and Australian literature; strengthening the Major Performing Arts Framework; and contributing to the National Arts and Disability Strategy. We also recognise the importance of philanthropic funding to the creative and cultural sectors, including corporate sponsorship.

The marketplace for creativity and culture is increasingly global

Australian arts and culture will continue to compete for audiences in an increasingly global marketplace over the next 4 years. New access pathways are opening up through technological innovation and Australia's cultural institutions continue to adapt in order to take advantage of new technology, while preserving their important collections for future generations. We undertake a range of work to promote Australia's arts and culture internationally, including Indigenous arts and culture, performing arts, visual arts and literature.

We support our sectoral institutions and portfolio entities, including the national broadcasters and the national cultural institutions to: engage with new audiences in new ways; increase creative participation; build creative skills and attract and support new talent; to be sustainable and internationally renowned; and meet the needs of Australian consumers.

Our support to the national elite performing arts training organisations helps to educate and train the next generation of professional performing artists and associated arts workers. Graduates are instrumental in sustaining the financial and cultural success of the national and international entertainment industries.

Australian media and culture is diverse and vibrant

The changing digital environment is defined by the wide range of media voices and perspectives available to consumers. We are adaptive to this changing environment and we are committed to ensuring Australia's culture, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices, are heard, preserved and protected for generations to come.

Performance measures, targets and assessments

Inclusiveness means all Australians have the opportunity to participate in diverse creative and cultural experiences, including people in regional, rural and remote areas, and people with a disability

Effectiveness measures: inclusiveness


This table includes measure numbers 16 and 17. The measure is an effectiveness measure and is under the topic ‘Inclusiveness’. 

Measure 16 is Engagement with the national cultural institutions, indicated through: (a) the number of in person visits to engage with national collecting institutions (including on  and off site visits), (b) the percentage of objects in national collections accessible online, and (c) the number of website visits to the national cultural institutions. A footnote explains that off-site visits include visits to travelling and outreach programs/supported events/exhibitions (including viewing artworks and cultural objects loaned from collecting institutions).
•	the previous result against this measure was, in 2017-18: (a) 9.9 million in person visits; (b) 8.31% of objects accessible online; and (c) 46.6 million website visits
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is To maintain or increase 2018–19 results compared to annual averages since 2012–13: (a) ≥9.6 million in person visits; (b) ≥6.39% objects accessible online; and (c) ≥42.7 million website visits. A footnote explains that the indicators for engagement with the national cultural institutions were established in 2012–13
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to maintain engagement in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “We have budgeted $2.250 billion from 2018–19 to 2021–22 for Australia’s national cultural institutions:
o	Australia Council
o	Australian Film, Television and Radio School
o	Screen Australia
o	Creative Partnerships Australia
o	the national collecting institutions:
	Australian National Maritime Museum
	Bundanon Trust
	Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House
	National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
	National Gallery of Australia
	National Library of Australia
	National Museum of Australia
	National Portrait Gallery of Australia.”
Measure 17 is an assessment of the impact of our programs to support inclusion of: (a) regional, rural and remote Australians, and (b) people with a disability. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider whether regional grant programs are rolling out and the National Arts and Disability Strategy has been advanced in line with expectations.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our programs to support inclusiveness across Australia’s regional areas include the Regional Arts Fund, Festivals Australia and Visions of Australia grants. We are a partner in the National Arts and Disability Strategy and through the strategy we work to facilitate access and participation to the arts by people with a disability.”

 

We want growth for sustainable and innovative creative and cultural sectors

Effectiveness measures: growth

This table includes measure numbers 18 and 19. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Growth’.
Measure 18 is GDP contribution by the creative and cultural sectors, including: (a) overall contribution, (b) contribution of broadcasting, electronic or digital media and film, and (c) contribution of music composition and publishing.
•	the previous result against this measure was in 2016–17: (a) $111.713 billion overall GDP contribution, (b) $9.707 billion contribution of broadcasting, electronic or digital media and film, and (c) $148 million contribution of music composition and publishing
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is to exceed 2016–17 results in 2017–18. A note explains that 2017–18 data is expected to be the most current available for 2018–19 reporting
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for GDP contribution to continue to grow in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “In reporting on GDP and employment for the creative and cultural sectors, we include activities connected with the arts, media, heritage, design, fashion, and information technology. Between 2008–09 and 2016–17, cultural and creative activity in Australia grew to $111.713 billion, an increase of $25.757 billion or 30%. This measure demonstrates whether we are providing an environment which adequately supports the cultural and creative sectors to enable economic growth and benefit Australia’s economy.”
Measure 19 is Philanthropic funding to the creative and cultural sectors, including: (a) estimated private sector support to the arts, and (b) to organisations listed on the Register of Cultural Organisations. A footnote explains that the Register of Cultural Organisations is a list of organisations that can receive tax deductible gifts (Public art galleries, museums and libraries are generally not included on the register because they are approved by the Australian Taxation Office under another deductible gift recipient category).
•	the previous result against this measure was, in 2016–17, (a) estimated private sector support to the arts was approximately $300 million, and (b) donations to organisations listed on the Register of Cultural Organisations were valued at $110.6 million
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is, in 2017–18 : (a) ≥$300 million estimated private sector support to the arts, and (b) ≥$100 million donations to organisations listed on the Register of Cultural Organisations. A note explains that 2017–18 data is expected to be the most current available for 2018–19 reporting.
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for philanthropic funding to continue to grow in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Philanthropy and corporate sponsorship play an essential role in the sustainability of Australia’s creative and cultural sectors. This measure provides insight into the level of funding provided through these avenues.”

 

We contribute to preserving, protecting and celebrating Australia's arts and culture, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices, for generations to come

Effectiveness measures: protecting and promoting Australian culture

This table includes measure numbers 20 and 21. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Protecting and promoting Australian culture’. 
Measure 20 is the number of students successfully completing courses at national elite performing arts training organisations
•	the previous result against this measure was 1,198 in 2017
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is 800 in 2018
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are 800 in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “We have budgeted $106.3 million from 2018–19 to 2022–23 to support the 7 national elite performing arts training organisations:
o	Australian Ballet School
o	Australian National Academy of Music
o	Australian Youth Orchestra
o	Flying Fruit Fly Circus
o	National Aboriginal and Islander Skills Development Association (NAISDA) Dance College
o	National Institute of Circus Arts
o	National Institute of Dramatic Art”
Measure 21 is an assessment of the impact of our programs on supporting, preserving and celebrating: (a) Indigenous languages and arts, and (b) Australian creativity and culture internationally. A footnote explains that our assessment will consider a range of resources on Indigenous visual arts, Indigenous languages and screen policy implementation.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our programs to support, preserve and celebrate Indigenous languages and arts are the Indigenous Languages and Arts program, the Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support program and Indigenous repatriation. We support Australian creativity and culture internationally in a variety of ways, including through cultural exchanges, work with the national collecting institutes and work to support the Australian film industry.”

 

Our content and media frameworks provide appropriate classifications for screen content and supports creators, industry and consumers so everyone can access the communications, creative and cultural benefits of Australian content and media

Effectiveness measures: protecting and promoting Australian content

This table includes measure numbers 22 and 23. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic ‘Protecting and promoting Australian content’. 
Measure 22 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the content regulatory framework for classification, Australian content and copyright. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider information about classification decisions from the Classification Board and the Classification Review Board; data on Australian content compliance and expenditure; information about payments made to content creators by the Copyright Agency; and data from the annual Consumer Survey on Online Copyright Infringement.
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Our content regulatory framework for classification, Australian content and copyright is integral to supporting growth and inclusiveness in Australia’s creative sector and to protecting and promoting Australian content.”
Measure 23 is an Assessment of whether the media regulatory framework is fit for purpose. A footnote explains that this assessment will consider data from the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), including on media audiences, advertising trends and broadcasting complaints, and audience metrics from the national broadcasters (ABC and SBS).
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “We regularly review the media regulatory framework, including to ensure an appropriate balance between supporting industry sustainability and providing protections for the Australian community.”

 

Program resourcing (input), output and efficiency measures

This table includes measure numbers 24, 25 and 26. The measures are program resourcing (input), output and efficiency measures. 
Measure 24 is arts and cultural development (program 2.1). A footnote explains that funds to the national broadcasters (the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the Special Broadcasting Services Corporation) are paid under program 1.1 (measure 13, connectivity purpose), but the work of the broadcasters is also relevant to achieving this purpose.
•	the previous result against this measure was $676.7 million in 2017–18 (0.5% less than budgeted)
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for 2018–19 expenses to be within 5% of published budget figures
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for expenses in forward years to be within 5% of published budget figures
•	extra explanatory information about the measure reads: “Budget figures are forecast in the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and, if required, updated in the Mid Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) and Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (PAES).”
Measure 25 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the department’s oversight of arts and cultural portfolio entities. A footnote explains that the arts and cultural portfolio entities are the national cultural institutions.
•	the previous result against this measure was that the department was effective in 2017–18
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for the department to be effective in 2018–19. A footnote explains that we determine whether we are providing effective oversight of our portfolio entities by assessing whether we have undertaken oversight appropriate to each entity. Our oversight activities for a given entity may include providing advice on corporate planning and annual reporting, advising our Minister on matters such as board appointments and monitoring entity performance against government objectives.
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are that the department is effective in forward years
Measure 26 is an assessment of whether program 2.1 administered items are delivered efficiently:
•	there is no previous result against this measure as the measure has not been previously measured
•	the 2018–19 target for this measure is for administered items to be delivered on time and on budget in 2018–19, indicating efficient delivery
•	forward targets for 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021–22 are for administered items to continue to be administered on time and on budget, indicating efficient delivery.

 

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Capability: Our key strategies and plans for achieving our purposes

Over the 4 years covered by this Corporate Plan, we will focus on building employee understanding of our new overarching strategic vision and develop a workforce plan to build on our capabilities under our vision:

to be the pre-eminent national entity for communications
policy, planning, investment and research

to be an effective and accountable leader on
telecommunications, broadcasting and digital regulation

to foster and promote Australian content and creativity
domestically and abroad on a variety of platforms

to have a view on the right outcome

to be outstanding program managers

to foster an inclusive, high-performing workplace

 

Workforce planning

In 2018–19, we will develop a department-wide strategic workforce plan which will inform high level recruitment, capability development and talent management strategies, and ensure we have the optimal workforce in place to respond to rapidly changing operating conditions.

Our workforce plan will be developed in 4 phases to help us identify our:

  1. future operating environment and organisational priorities
  2. current workforce profile and forecast supply of labour
  3. gaps between current and future workforce and risks
  4. mitigation strategies and accountabilities

We will also develop operational workforce plans that include actionable strategies for each division to address workforce gaps. Our plans aim to ensure we are able to deliver against environmental pressures and have a workforce with the right mix of people, knowledge, skills and behaviours.

A Skills and Experience Register will be implemented in 2018–19 to capture and report capabilities and development for each employee, in a central, easily accessible system (Learnhub). Information from the register will help to inform our assessment of our internal workforce supply and will give greater visibility of employee skills, knowledge, experience and interest in mobility.

While we develop our plan around our vision, we will continue to focus on:

  • leadership

We demonstrate leadership and corporate citizenship across government, the portfolio and within the department. At all levels, we seek evidence-based and proactive thought leadership, underpinned by genuine curiosity, and an appetite to engage intelligently with risk. We also seek clear communication skills and shared vision, and a pragmatic approach to implementing decisions that are free from bias.

Change is communicated and managed effectively, informed by business planning processes and priorities.

Our leaders provide feedback and engage in ongoing quality conversations with employees so that performance expectations are clear and development opportunities are acted upon. Leaders actively support and promote capability development with a focus on building core skills, strengthening governance and operational management practices. Capability development is aligned with current and future workforce needs.

  • policy and program skills
We continue to:
  • build skills and best practice public administration capabilities in policy development, the development of quality measures for programs, and risk management
  • build a strong and integrated evidence-based research capability
  • focus on economic analysis of communication technologies and their impact on markets and the role of arts in supporting cultural and broader outcomes
  • enhance our understanding of markets, competition and commercial performance ensuring we provide authoritative policy advice
  • strengthen our ability to identify, analyse and report on the arts, digital technologies, communications services and market trends to inform policy priorities.
  • stakeholder engagement

We are building on our capabilities which support our engagement and contribution across the department, the APS, all levels of government, industry and the community.

We value our alliances and professional relationships within the communications and arts sectors, the broader Commonwealth and our international as well as state and territory counterparts. Working closely with stakeholders ensures our policy advice is strategic, innovative, connected and achievable, and our programs deliver quality outcomes for all Australians.

  • Information and communications technology (ICT)

Our 4 year strategic ICT plan will align with this Corporate Plan, our internal business plans, and whole of government directions while leveraging advances within the wider technology environment. The ICT strategic plan is built on 5 core strategic directions.

  1. Focus on business value
    IT will focus on creating, building and maintaining business value for the department by the prioritisation, definition and selection of technology services.
  2. Leverage data and information
    Making information, regardless of source, easy to discover and accessible.
  3. Prepare for disruption
    Selecting and designing IT with the understanding that the business functions they support could be re-engineered, removed or relocated at any time.
  4. Deliver efficiently
    Delivering better, more innovative and intuitive technology faster and cheaper than ever before.
  5. Align to Whole of Government strategies
    Aligning to WoG strategies that exist across a range of IT functions and services.

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Risk oversight and management

We have established systems of risk oversight, management and internal controls in accordance with section 16 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy. This includes regular monitoring and reporting on the risk environment to both the Audit Committee and during the business planning and review process. The Executive, through our whole of department business planning process, are active in identifying emerging risks and provide support to the Secretary in the strategic management of the department's risks. Our strategic risks are matters which are fundamental to the function of the communications and arts sectors, material in delivering government agendas, and important in supporting the wellbeing of the Australian community.

We actively identify emerging risks and have identified 5 enterprise risks which we face over the next 4 years. These are closely linked to our ability to achieve our purpose.

Enterprise risk Mitigating strategies
  1. Failing to fulfil the government's strategic priority to enhance telecommunications infrastructure and consumers' access to reliable communications services.
We provide the government with advice about short, medium and long-term options to reduce telecommunications market and technology risks. In addition, we engage closely with, and leverage processes and expertise of, other bodies such as portfolio entities, the Australian Communications and Media Authority and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Regulatory and market interventions are designed to be technology neutral so that they do not differentiate between the underlying network or device used to deliver or receive the communications service. We are considering options to ensure that, as the Australian telecommunications sector evolves, Australian premises continue to have access to adequate voice services as well as high quality broadband services. We monitor relevant market developments, and provide early advice to government on major risks, opportunities and relevant policy options in response.
  1. Our interaction with stakeholders and consumers is inadequate to enable us to provide authoritative advice to the government on portfolio issues.
We have a stakeholder engagement framework which, as part of normal business processes, actively seeks stakeholder views and reports on these views as required. In addition, we actively seek stakeholder views about the level of engagement through existing relationships and forums and other mechanisms.
  1. Our focus and resources are not aligned appropriately to deliver on policy, program, regulation or corporate outcomes.

Our strategic and business planning processes provide oversight of the delivery of departmental and portfolio activities and align with our budgeting process. Our risk management processes align with our activities. Capital projects are considered by our IT Governance and Finance and HR committees and are approved by the Secretary. IT and finance projects follow set governance guidelines and are actively monitored and reported on a monthly basis. We utilise agile work practices and deploy taskforces and short-term project teams to bring necessary expertise and resourcing to urgent and strategic work priorities. In addition, we:

  • undertake reviews of our program delivery
  • utilise an internal audit capacity
  • research economic drivers and international approaches which inform improved policy and program delivery.
  1. Our policy advice is sub-optimal as it is not forward looking and strategic.
Our business plans reflect the government's agenda and emphasise expectations around strategic advice. Emerging strategic issues are collectively progressed in Executive forums including the business planning and review process. We review plans regularly to ensure ongoing strategic relevance.
  1. We do not have the capability or capacity to achieve our purpose.
We work with peak bodies and other stakeholders to encourage consumer and sector participation in the delivery of our purpose. We also work with other portfolio, and state and territory governments to leverage government investment and capability to achieve our outcomes. We have implemented performance and capability strategies including talent management and a secondment program. We have completed enabling programs in policy essentials and public policy. We utilise agile work practices and deploy taskforces and short-term project teams to bring necessary expertise and resourcing to urgent and strategic work priorities.

Our Chief Risk Officer role is now at First Assistant Secretary level, giving increased oversight in implementing measures to:

  • develop and maintain the capacity and capability of risk management
  • effectively and efficiently manage risk
  • encourage and build a positive risk culture
  • oversee the department's enterprise risk management system
  • coordinate overall enterprise risk management activities

Risk management has been integrated into our new business planning processes so that:

  • our purpose and strategic priorities set the context for risk management
  • high priority risks influence business planning, and their treatments are integrated into business plans
  • risk treatments which require resources are considered and provided for in branch, operational and/or project plans and budgets
  • all major change activities include structured risk management
  • business processes and capabilities which function as risk controls and treatments are maintained as required by a relevant risk assessment

The enhanced risk framework facilitates a culture that promotes an open and proactive approach to managing risk. It encourages risk assessment, informed risk-taking and the anticipation and treatment of risk in delivering our priorities.

We are committed to achieving our strategic priorities and encourage prudent risk-taking based on sound judgement and the best available information to facilitate innovation leading to the provision of better processes and services.

Our risk appetite is defined through the business planning and review process, and conveys:

  • an explanation of the concept of risk appetite and the importance of effective engagement with risk
  • an expression of our relative tolerance for different natures or categories of risk
  • examples of areas of high and low tolerance to enable employees to better interpret the guidance
  • areas where risk is to be minimised wherever possible.

Compliance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

Item Topic Matters to be included Included in
1 Introduction

The following:

  • a statement that the plan is prepared for section 35(1)(b) of the Act
  • the reporting period for which the plan is prepared
  • the reporting periods covered by the plan.
Secretary's statement
2 Purposes The purposes of the entity. Role and purposes
3 Environment The environment in which the entity will operate for each reporting period covered by the plan. Operating environment
4 Performance

For each reporting period covered by the plan, a summary of:

  • how the entity will achieve the entity's purposes
  • how any subsidiary of the entity will contribute to achieving the entity's purposes*
  • how the entity's performance will be measured and assessed in achieving the entity's purposes, including any measures, targets and assessments that will be used to measure and assess the entity's performance for the purposes of preparing the entity's annual performance statements.
How we will achieve our purposes, and measure achievement
5 Capability The key strategies and plans that the entity will implement in each reporting period covered by the plan to achieve the entity's purposes. Capability: Our key strategies and plans for achieving our purposes
6 Risk oversight and management A summary of the risk oversight and management systems of the entity for each reporting period covered by the plan (including any measures that will be implemented to ensure compliance with the finance law). Risk oversight and management

* We don't have any subsidiaries.

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