This 2019–20 corporate plan for the Department of Communications and the Arts describes how we provide the environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from communications services, creative experiences and culture.

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Contents

The Department of Communications and the Arts 2019–20 Corporate Plan is prepared for section 35(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, for the 2019–20 reporting period. It covers the period from 2019–20 to 2022–23.

Secretary's statement

I am pleased to present the 2019–20 corporate plan for the Department of Communications and the Arts.

This plan describes how we provide the environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from communications services, creative experiences and culture.

The contribution of this portfolio is fundamental to the wellbeing of our economy and society. Being able to connect with each other, both through communications services and creative and cultural experiences, enriches our social wellbeing.

Our purposes—connectivity, creativity and culture—are interdependent and complementary. We promote an innovative and competitive communications sector so that new services and technologies can provide new ways to access Australia's social, creative and cultural products. Demand for creative and cultural digital content is a significant driver of the changes we're experiencing in communications technology.

It is vital Australia invests in the communications infrastructure that will drive our economy forward, and promote sustainability, competition and growth. The portfolio will support this through regional connectivity programs, the completion of the National Broadband Network (NBN) rollout and delivering effective market settings. We are working with industry to support the evolution of mobile wireless communications technology and further improve connectivity.

A key priority for the coming year is progressing an ambitious reform agenda to protect Australians online. We will do this by:

  • clearly articulating expectations of industry
  • updating our legislative frameworks so they operate effectively
  • fostering an approach to online safety that involves a combined effort between government, industry and society.

Our investment in the creative and cultural sectors includes the national broadcasters and national collecting institutions. The importance and relevance of the arts to our lives is reflected in programs supporting the media and entertainment sector, music, visual arts and craft, performance, books and cultural celebrations. We are particularly proud of our work to support, preserve and celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices.

Over the next four years, we will have a particular focus on:

  • implementing the actions identified by the Taskforce to Combat Terrorist and Extreme Violent Material Online to enhance online safety, under the five key pillars of: prevention; transparency; deterrence; detection and removal; and capacity building
  • working with the international community, technology firms, social media platforms and other key bodies, to strengthen the online safety framework
  • implementing Keeping our Children Safe Online measures, including the Early Years Online Safety Program and the Online Safety Research Program, and overhauling online safety legislation
  • completing the NBN rollout and managing ongoing public investment in the NBN so that it is sustainable and delivers a high-quality broadband experience
  • facilitating the introduction of 5G mobile technology
  • establishing the Regional Connectivity Program and continuing the Mobile Black Spot Program
  • continuing to deliver and implement the Australian Government's reform agenda, including for classification, media, copyright, spectrum, and the new Universal Service Guarantee (USG)
  • ensuring the policy and regulatory settings in place reflect the contemporary environment, meet community expectations of consumer experience, public interest protections and public safety, promote investment, and support international competitiveness and the national interest
  • encouraging sustainability, diversity and recognition of Australia's cultural and creative sectors for productivity, growth and innovation. This includes supporting Indigenous arts and culture, Australian literature, the performing and visual arts, Australian screen production and the national collecting institutions
  • implementing the Australian Music Industry Package, including the Live Music Australia initiative
  • renewing the National Arts and Disability Strategy

During 2019–20, we will focus on further building our organisational capability, with a new learning and development strategy, to empower our people to learn, develop and grow. As well, we will refresh our Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2016–19, to ensure continued relevance for an inclusive workplace.

As we work to implement this plan, we will be guided by our strategic vision:

  • to be the pre-eminent national entity for communications policy, planning, investment and research
  • to be an effective and accountable leader on telecommunications, broadcasting, classification and digital regulation
  • to foster and promote Australian content and creativity domestically and abroad on a variety of platforms
  • to have a view on the right outcome
  • to be outstanding program managers
  • to foster an inclusive, high-performing workplace.

I look forward to working with our portfolio and industry partners throughout 2019–20 and the forward years and note their vital contributions to connectivity, creativity and culture.

Mike Mrdak AO
Secretary

 

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Our role and purposes

Our role is to provide an environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from communications services, creative experiences and culture.

Our purposes are:

Connectivity

Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services and technologies, for inclusiveness and sustainable economic growth.

Creativity and culture

Supporting inclusiveness and growth in Australia's creative sector, and protecting and promoting Australian content and culture.

Our work touches every region and part of the Australian community, underpinning our economy and society and enabling communication and creative industries. We provide an environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from connectivity, creativity and culture through:

Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services

We enable investment in infrastructure and support the market to give Australians access to quality communications services, including in rural and remote areas.

Inclusiveness

We ensure all Australians can benefit from connectivity. Also important are effective community safeguards to inform and protect Australians online. Inclusiveness also means that all Australians have access to, and the opportunity to participate in, diverse creative and cultural experiences.

Economic growth

Our policy settings support economic growth by enabling the communications sector to invest and innovate, compete internationally and meet the needs of consumers and business. We also enable growth for sustainable and innovative creative and cultural sectors.

Protecting and promoting Australian content

Our content and media frameworks provide appropriate consumer information for screen content and support creators, industry and consumers.  This assists everyone to access the communications, creative and cultural benefits of Australian content and media.

Developing, protecting and promoting Australian culture

We contribute to creating, preserving and celebrating Australia's arts and culture, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices.

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How we will achieve our purposes

We achieve our purposes through delivering:

  • Strategic advice and policy development—providing government with the best options and policy advice on issues relating to communications and the arts, including the delivery of services to regional and remote Australia. Our advice is evidence-based and is informed by research, stakeholder consultation and critical analysis of sectoral developments and market trends in both a domestic and international context.
  • Effective program and grants management—delivering efficient and effective programs, grants and services to achieve the government's policy outcomes. We adhere to the highest standards of public administration.
  • Regulatory management—administering portfolio legislation efficiently and effectively. We review and shape regulatory frameworks and we assist the Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts, and the Minister for Regional Services, Decentralisation and Local Government to fulfil their parliamentary obligations.
  • Collaborative stakeholder engagement—working with portfolio entities, government stakeholders, international organisations, industry, research institutions and the community to develop innovative advice and ensure that the advice and services the department delivers are effective and meet the needs of the community. We engage proactively with our stakeholders with a clear understanding of their issues and challenges and we value diverse perspectives and ideas.

What we will do to achieve our purposes

We undertake activities to provide an environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from connectivity, creativity and culture.

Infrastructure

We encourage investment in communications infrastructure to enable a sustainable and competitive sector.

Infrastructure: internet, radio, television, phone.
  • Delivering broadband policy, including on the National Broadband Network (NBN), and the operation, performance and governance of NBN Co Limited
  • Developing and implementing telecommunications policy and programs in regional and remote Australia, including the Mobile Black Spot Program, Regional Connectivity Program and regional broadcasting

Consumers

We enable effective broadband transition, and protections and safeguards so that consumers can interact safely in a trusted digital environment.

Consumers: internet, phone, triple zero.
  • Working with industry and regulators on the effective migration of services to the NBN, service continuity and measures to support a positive NBN consumer experience
  • Ensuring access to voice services through the Universal Service Obligation (USO) and, going forward, to voice and broadband services through development of the Universal Service Guarantee (USG)
  • Modernising consumer safeguards
  • Supporting accessibility of services , including for those with disability
  • Managing delivery of key contracts for the USO, the National Relay Service and Triple Zero

Markets

We implement reform to create a contemporary policy framework and effective market settings to encourage growth and innovation.

Markets: spectrum, internet, post, emerging technologies.
  • Modernising telecommunications market structures for fixed line and mobile markets, investment and competition
  • Advising on infrastructure deployment, privacy, security and resilience
  • Advising on modernisation and sustainability of the postal industry, including the international postal sector
  • Overseeing governance and performance of the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) and Australia Post
  • Advising on spectrum and radiocommunication allocation, management and reform, and lead international spectrum policy
  • Developing policy options for emerging technologies and issues, including smart cities, 5G, internet of things, and satellite developments
  • Promoting multi-stakeholder internet governance, which underpins an open, free and secure internet

Content

We support vibrant, diverse and sustainable content including the news and entertainment sector, well-functioning public broadcasting, and access to uniquely Australian content.

Content: television, internet, platforms, phone.
  • Regulating Australian content (including drama, children's, local and sport) across TV, radio, film, computer games, streaming, online and social media
  • Modernising Australia's copyright laws
  • Advising on media laws, regulation, and sustainability and diversity of the media sector, including newspapers and the Regional and small Publishers Jobs and Innovation Package
  • Developing policy options for competition, national and community broadcasting
  • Working with our national broadcasters—the ABC and SBS—to deliver on their charters
  • Supporting the Classification Board and Classification Review Board identify opportunities to reform the National Classification Scheme
  • Advising on digital platforms and online safety, including setting expectations for digital industry, regulation of harmful content, addressing regulatory imbalance, research, coordination and capacity building.

Arts

We support a sustainable, innovative and strong creative sector, which celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices, and preserves, protects and promotes our art and culture.

Arts: regional arts; indigenous arts and languages; international year of Indigenous languages; cultural heritage; museums, libraries and galleries; screen; literature; visual arts.
  • Promoting access and participation, including through regional and community arts, including Regional Arts Fund, Festivals Australia
  • Supporting the revitalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages through the Indigenous Languages and Arts program and the International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019
  • Advising on the arts disability strategy
  • Overseeing the national collecting institutions
  • Investing in collections and cultural heritage, including through touring and outreach assistance programs, the Indigenous Repatriation program
  • Protecting movable cultural heritage
  • Supporting creative industries, including Australia's screen and contemporary music industries
  • Delivering the lending rights programs and the Prime Minister's Literary Awards
  • Advising on copyright policy that supports creators and innovators
  • Delivering the Resale Royalty Scheme, Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support program and Artbank
  • Advising on Indigenous visual arts, including ensuring authenticity, and preventing 'fake art
  • Promoting development and investment in the arts through the Australia Council, national elite performing arts training organisations and the private sector

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How we will measure our achievements

We recognise that the achievement of our purposes is not solely our responsibility. Industry, consumer bodies and other government entities all have important contributions to make.

In particular, we work closely with our portfolio entities and collaborate with them to achieve our purposes and performance results.

For each purpose we have a small number of performance measures. We will use these to assess our performance in achieving our purposes over the next four years and to prepare our annual performance statements.

Connectivity

Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services and technologies, for inclusiveness and sustainable economic growth

Operating environment

Demand for communications is increasing, in an environment of rapid technological change

Connecting to communications services is increasingly necessary for people to participate in our economy, society, education and democracy. Supporting the market to deliver access to effective communications—post, telephone, internet, mobile—has been a constant of Commonwealth policy. In particular, we have a long-standing Telecommunications Universal Service Obligation in place for voice telephone services, and Australia Post has long delivered against community service obligations. However, the expectations of businesses and consumers are changing as technology rapidly evolves and as delivery faces new challenges.

Reflecting the economy's digital transformation, demand for communications goods and services is growing faster than that for other goods and services in the economy. Household appetite for data is forecast to jump from 95 gigabytes a month in 2016 to around 420 gigabytes a month by 2026. (Source: Bureau of Communications and Arts Research, Demand for fixed-line broadband in Australia.)

In this environment, it's critical that we support inclusive access for consumers to quality, affordable communications services, provided over modern infrastructure, technology and digital platforms. Our regulatory settings must maintain a safe digital environment for Australians while also continuing to provide the right incentives to support competition, growth and investment in communications infrastructure. We must continue to remove barriers to investment and innovation and be sufficiently flexible to adapt to rapidly changing market conditions. We will continue to monitor complaints and the enforcement of regulatory measures for insight into the effectiveness of Australia's communications services and consumer experience.

For Australian consumers, audiences are increasingly migrating to online platforms, which offer more choice and flexibility than traditional media. There are a number of report and review processes in relation to media frameworks we will need to respond to in the coming 12 months. These include:

  • the government's response to the ACCC Report on the Digital Platforms, which found the benefits that digital platforms have brought to consumers and businesses have not come without costs and consequences
  • the outcome of the stakeholder consultation relating to the 'Alston Determination', which excludes live internet streaming services from the definition of a 'broadcast service' under the Broadcasting Services Act 1992;
  • the Briggs Review into online safety legislation identifying the need to modernise the schedules of the Broadcasting Services Act that deal with online safety and the role of the Office of the eSafety Commissioner

Improvements to telecommunications are disrupting traditional business models

The National Broadband Network (NBN) is significantly changing the telecommunications market by progressively making fast broadband access available to all Australian premises. After the NBN rollout is completed in 2020, Australia will be the only continent where every household and business can access affordable high-speed broadband services. The minimum peak wholesale download speed will be at least 25 megabits per second (Mbps). This change will give all industries and businesses the opportunity to harness significant productivity benefits, as well as to innovate and develop new products and services. It will also increase the opportunities Australians have to engage digitally and enjoy the social and economic benefits of online services.

Australians are already amongst the world's most prolific users of mobile services and we have a highly competitive, high-quality industry. Our policy and regulatory settings support mobile services availability to more than 99% of our population. Our Mobile Black Spot Program is focused on extending mobile coverage to areas that are not otherwise commercially viable. Increased connectivity and capacity provided through fixed and mobile networks is contributing to the disruption of traditional business models. Disruption is particularly affecting traditional broadcasting activities (including television and radio), models of work, social communication and how Australians experience culture. While these technological advancements benefit Australians, regional Australia is at significant risk of losing local media with newspapers and television both suffering from significant revenue declines.

The digital economy is also having a profound impact on the postal sector. Letters are in significant decline, while the parcels and logistics sectors are transforming and growing rapidly to support ecommerce.

Spectrum is vital to the digital economy

Spectrum is a valuable input to enabling the digital economy, and efficient allocation is essential to move spectrum to its highest value use. Spectrum is essential to a networked economy and is a major contributor to Australia's economic and social wellbeing. The Centre for International Economics estimates the economic value of Australia's spectrum to be $177 billion over 15 years.

The efficient allocation of spectrum will contribute towards the financially sustainable and internationally competitive sector, which is able to innovate and meet the needs of Australian consumers. Policies for efficient allocation will best enable the roll out of 5G services, machine-to-machine communications, the Internet of Things and Smart City applications.

Addressing safety and consumer protection supports social inclusion

Security, safety and consumer protections have also become higher priorities for the communications sector. Addressing online safety priorities protects consumers, including children, from harm (including harmful content) but doing so is not without challenges. Responding to threats requires us to stay one step ahead of rival interests and to coordinate across government activities.

The live-streaming of the Christchurch terror attacks on 15 March 2019 starkly illustrated the need for more proactive measures to prevent the exploitation of digital platforms and the capacity for harmful material to be rapidly propagated online.

After these events, the Australian Government formed the Taskforce to Combat Terrorist and Extreme Violent Material Online. The taskforce was comprised of representatives of industry and government agencies. It provided advice to government on practical, tangible and effective measures and commitments to combat the upload and dissemination of terrorist and extreme violent material online. The taskforce's final consensus report was released in June 2019. It provides recommendations designed to curb the dissemination of terrorist and extreme violent material online. We will be closely monitoring the implementation of these voluntary commitments to assess whether the actions are a sufficient step forward in terms of ensuring the safety of Australians online.

The government has also committed to consolidating and updating regulatory arrangements for online safety in light of changes in the digital environment. This statutory overhaul was recommended by Ms Lynelle Briggs AO in her reviews of the Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015 and the Online Content Scheme (Briggs Review) in late 2018. This will be a key priority for our work over the coming years.

However, we need to look beyond legislation to protect Australians from harmful online experiences. Building resilience within the community and supporting respectful online conduct are essential in tackling the potential for harm online. This will be achieved through a variety of measures, including education, awareness raising, frontline support and research to better understand online safety issues.

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Performance measures, targets and assessments

Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communication services

This table includes performance measures, targets and assessments for measure numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4. The measures are effectiveness measures grouped under the topic, 'Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services'. 
Measure 1 is the percentage of Universal Service Obligation targets met by Telstra and Community Service Obligations met by Australia Post. It is tagged as activity related to Consumers and Markets.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is 100% in 2019–20. The targets for forward years 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are 100%.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'We have budgeted 1.080 billion dollars from 2019–20 to 2022–23 to pay for the Universal Service Obligation, ensuring all Australians, wherever they live or work, have reasonable access to voice-only standard telephone services and payphones. Australia Post's community service obligations are set in legislation and include guarantees for letter services that meet the social, industrial and commercial needs of our country. We oversee Australia Post as one of our portfolio entities.'
Measure 2 is the percentage of the population with access to mobile coverage. It is tagged as activity related to Markets.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is to maintain ≥99% in 2019–20. The table notes that this measure is being replaced from 2020–21 with measure 3.  The new measure if more closely aligned with the success of the Mobile Black Spot Program itself.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our budget includes 380 million dollars in funding from 2015–16 to 2022–23 to deliver the Mobile Black Spot Program and 60 million dollars from 2019–20 to 2020–21 for the Regional Connectivity Program.  These programs will improve connectivity in regional and remote Australia.
Measure 3 is the amount of new and improved mobile coverage delivered in regional areas under the Mobile Black Spot Program.  It is tagged as activity related to Markets.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is more than or equal to 95 per cent of total contracted (predictive) coverage is delivered.  Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to be confirmed, subject to outcomes of competitive grants processes for rounds 5 and 6 of the program.
Measure 4 is premises with high-speed NBN broadband access.  It is tagged as activity related to infrastructure.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is 11.5 million premises ready to connect to the NBN by 30 June 2020. Under forward year targets, the table notes that NBN rollout will be complete.  For measures related to broadband in 2020–21 and beyond, see measures 5 and 10.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'NBN Co is rolling out high-speed broadband services across Australia. We oversee NBN Co as one our portfolio entities, and manage ongoing Government investment in the company.'

This table includes measure numbers 5 and 6. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Enabling all Australians to connect to Effective communications (Access)'.
Measure 5 is the minimum fixed broadband download speeds available to Australian premises. It is tagged as activity related to Consumers and Markets.
There is no 2019–20 target for this measure as first results are not expected until late 2020. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are divided into a target for premises served through NBN Co and premises served through other Statutory Infrastructure Providers. The target for premises served through NBN Co is that, when completed in June 2020, the NBN is expected to offer at least 25 megabits per second peak wholesale speeds to every premises, and at least 50 megabits per second peak wholesale speeds to 90 per cent of premises in the fixed line footprint, except for premises still in the co-existence period. The target for premises served through other Statutory Infrastructure Providers is that Statutory Infrastructure Providers provide a minimum standard of broadband (including at least 25 megabits per second peak wholesale speeds) to every premises in Australia on reasonable request from a retail provider.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Requiring minimum broadband speeds be available to all Australian premises maximises opportunities for consumers and businesses to benefit from internet and digital services.'

Measure 6 is an assessment of telecommunications and postal services complaints data. It is tagged as activity related to Consumers and Markets.  
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for reporting in 2019–20 to show positive results. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for reporting to continue to show positive results.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Complaints data gives valuable insight into the effectiveness of Australia's postal and telecommunications services and the consumer experience.'

Inclusiveness

This table includes measure numbers 7, 8 and 9. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Inclusiveness'.
Measure 7 is an assessment of the affordability of telecommunications services (mobile and fixed) on offer. It is tagged as activity related to Consumers.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for affordability to be maintained or increased in 2019–20. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to continue to maintain or increase affordability over time.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Communications services are increasingly essential for accessing information, employment, markets and key services; and demand in recent years has grown rapidly. We work with the ACCC to help support competitive communications markets that can also deliver affordable services, including for vulnerable groups.'

Measure 8 is the impact of our programs on improving connectivity for people with disability. It is tagged as activity related to Consumers.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for impact to be maintained or increased in 2019–20. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to continue to maintain or increase impact over time.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our work to improve connectivity for people with disability includes managing the contract for delivery of the National Relay Service which helps deaf, hearing and/or speech-impaired people to make and receive phone calls. We also conduct research and community focussed initiatives aimed at increasing knowledge and awareness of accessible communications services.  We also set policy for captioning regulation for broadcasting services and are developing options for the implementation of audio description for people who are blind or vision impaired.'

Measure 9 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the digital safety regulatory framework. It is tagged as activity related to Content.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for reporting in 2019–20 to show positive results. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for reporting to continue to show positive results.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our work to improve digital safety includes advising on a range of online safety and online gambling policy issues, administering the Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015 and the Interactive Gambling Act 2001, and providing policy oversight of the eSafety Commissioner. Our regulatory interventions are complemented by a research program to build the evidence base to help us understand online safety challenges and improve government interventions'.

Sustainable economic growth

This table includes measure numbers 10, 11, 12 and 13. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Sustainable economic growth'.
Measure 10 is the percentage of ready to connect premises in fixed line areas that have taken up an NBN service. It is tagged as activity related to Infrastructure.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is equal to or greater than 56 per cent at 30 June 2020. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to increase take up in forward years, to equal to or greater than 73 per cent by 31 December 2021.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'A large number of premises will become ready to connect to NBN in 2019–20. Through take-up, consumers are unlocking the economic benefits of the NBN.'

Measure 11 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the department's international engagement on post, spectrum, telecommunications, and internet governance outcomes. It is tagged as activity related to Markets.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'We represent Australia at meetings of the Universal Postal Union (UPU), the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). The UPU sets rules for international mail. The ITU is responsible for information and communication technologies, including allocating global radio spectrum. ICANN plays an important role in managing and coordinating the policies, standards and infrastructure that underpins the internet. The work we do through these forums is integral to Australia's communications framework, particularly to staying competitive in a global market.'

Measure 12 is GDP contribution enabled by the communications sector. It is tagged as activity related to Markets.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is equal to or greater than 730 billion dollars in 2017–18 (a note explains that 2017–18 data is expected to be the most current available for 2019–20 reporting). Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to maintain or increase GDP contribution over time.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'The communications sector is a critical enabler of economic activity. Although its direct contribution to the economy and employment is relatively small, the sector exerts a substantial influence on other sectors as an enabler of economic activity and progress. This measure demonstrates whether we are providing an environment with the right policy and regulatory settings to support the sector to enable economic growth and benefit Australia's economy.'

Measure 13 is investment as a proportion of output in the communications sector (a note explains that 'output in the communications sector' refers to the value added by the Information, Media and Telecommunications Industry (as defined under the Australian and New Zealand Industry classification) The value added refers o the total value of goods and services produced by an industry, after deducting the cost of goods and services used in the process of production). It is tagged as activity related to Markets.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is greater than 33 per cent in 2018–19 (a note explains that 2018–19 data is expected to be the most current available for 2019–20 reporting). Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are greater than 33% in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our policy settings need to encourage confidence in the communications sector, to enable businesses and industry to invest in and build critical communications infrastructure. Investment is key to unlocking economic growth as technologies continue to develop and improve, including with the introduction of 5G mobile technology and the delivery of other new communications infrastructure.

Efficiency

This table includes measure numbers 14, 15 and 16. Measures 14 and 16 are efficiency measures, while measure 15 is an effectiveness measure.  They are grouped under the topic 'Efficiency'.
Measure 14 is expenses for digital technologies and communications services (program 1.1).
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for 2019–20 expenses to be within 5% of published budget figures. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for expenses in forward years to be within 5% of published budget figures.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Budget figures are forecast in the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and, if required, updated in the Mid Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) and Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (PAES). Program 1.1 includes funding for the two national broadcasters (the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the Special Broadcasting Services Corporation). Funding the work of the broadcasters is also relevant to achieving the creativity and culture purpose. We have budgeted $5.453 billion from 2019–20 to 2022 23 for the national broadcasters through program 1.1.'

Measure 15 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the department's oversight of communications portfolio entities. It is tagged as activity related to Content, Markets, Infrastructure and Consumers.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for the oversight to be effective in 2019–20. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to be effective in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'The operation of our portfolio entities is vital to achieving purpose efficiently. We determine whether we are providing effective oversight of our portfolio entities by assessing whether we have undertaken activities appropriate to each entity. Our oversight activities focus on: entity corporate planning and annual reporting, Budget and operational funding; advising our Minister on governance arrangements, including Board appointments and operational policy settings.'

Measure 16 is an assessment of whether program 1.1 administered items are delivered efficiently. It is tagged as activity related to Content, Markets, Infrastructure and Consumers.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for administered items to be delivered on time and on budget in 2019–20, indicating efficient delivery. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for administered items to continue to be delivered on time and on budget, indicating efficient delivery.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'The efficient delivery of our administered items is important to ensuring we remain sustainable over time.'

 

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Creativity and culture

Supporting inclusiveness and growth in Australia's creative sector, and protecting and promoting Australian content and culture.

Operating environment

Our creative and cultural sectors enrich the lives of Australians and keep our economy strong

Australia's creative and cultural sectors are already prominent in the economy and their contribution is expected to grow further in coming years. Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that in 2016–17 cultural and creative activity added approximately $111.7 billion to Australia's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), equivalent to over 6%. The number of people employed in creative occupations has grown rapidly, about double the rate of other occupations between 2011 and 2016. Around 845,000 people were employed in creative or cultural industries and/or occupations in 2016.

Our national cultural institutions play an important role in preserving and providing access to Australia's cultural heritage and developing our diverse creative practitioners, and are vital to Australia's innovation agenda.

The broadcasting sector is also integral to a thriving creative economy. Broadcasters are an important source of quality news journalism, content diversity and Australian content in a converged, digital environment of almost limitless choice and multiple delivery systems.  Broadcasters are essential to achieving cultural policy objectives. They are an important means by which Australian audiences find, see and hear quality media content, including Australian content. They are also the connection between the creators of Australian content and a mass audience.

Our focus is on contributing to the broader Australian Government agenda of encouraging productivity, growth, inclusiveness and innovation. We do this through supporting the links between innovation, arts and creativity. This creates a modern regime to enable creators to have the confidence to produce world-quality Australian products. One important way we are promoting creativity, cultural works and economic activity is through an effective copyright framework. The framework aims to strike an appropriate balance between encouraging new innovations while ensuring respect for the creative efforts and economic rights of copyright owners.

Australians are highly engaged with the arts

Creativity and cultural experiences contribute to a cohesive Australian society and are essential to our national identity and prosperity. Approximately 98% of Australians engage with the arts. We promote inclusive access, appropriate protections and the sustainability, diversity and recognition of the sector. This includes:

  • regulating classification for screen content
  • delivering grant programs which support creative industries, Indigenous arts and culture and Australian literature
  • strengthening the Major Performing Arts Framework
  • contributing to the National Arts and Disability Strategy

We also recognise the importance of philanthropic funding to the creative and cultural sectors, including corporate sponsorship.

The marketplace for creativity and culture is increasingly global

Australian arts and culture will continue to compete for audiences in an increasingly global marketplace over the next four years. New access pathways are opening up through technological innovation. Australia's collecting institutions continue to adapt in order to take advantage of new technology, while preserving their important collections for future generations. We undertake a range of activities to promote Australia's arts and culture internationally, including our Indigenous arts and culture, performing arts, visual arts and literature.

We support our sectoral institutions and portfolio entities, including the national broadcasters and the national cultural institutions to:

  • engage with new audiences in new ways
  • increase creative participation
  • build creative skills and attract and support new talent
  • to be sustainable and internationally renowned
  • meet the needs of Australian consumers

Our support to the national elite performing arts training organisations helps to educate and train the next generation of professional performing artists and associated arts workers. Graduates are instrumental in sustaining the financial and cultural success of the national and international entertainment industries.

Australia's local music industry is one of our most important cultural exports, contributing up to $6 billion to our economy each year. We support Australian musicians in expanding into lucrative international markets through the Australian Music Industry Package. The package includes activities to enable Australian businesses to host more Australian live music events featuring home grown artists. It provides new mentoring and development programs to encourage greater representation of women and Indigenous artists in the music industry and boost support provided through the Contemporary Music Touring Program and Sounds Australia to promote Australian artists in emerging markets.

Australian media and culture is diverse and vibrant

The changing digital environment is defined by the wide range of media voices and perspectives available to consumers. This confirms the need for a strong media sector which:

  • informs and binds communities through local news
  • provides a platform for Australian ideas and stories
  • provides employment opportunities
  • contributes to our creative sector and economy more broadly

We are adaptive to this changing environment and we are committed to ensuring Australia's culture, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices, is preserved and protected for generations to come.

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Performance measures, targets and assessments

Inclusiveness and access

This table includes measure numbers 17 and 18. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Inclusiveness and access'. 
Measure 17 is engagement with the national cultural institutions, indicated through three elements:.  The first is the number of in person visits to engage with national collecting institutions (including on- and off-site visits). A footnote indicates that off-site visits include visits to travelling and outreach programs/ supported events/ exhibitions (including viewing artworks and cultural objects loaned from collecting institutions).  The second element of this measure is the percentage of objects in national collections accessible online, and the third is the number of web visits to the national cultural institutions. It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is to maintain or increase 2019–20 results compared to annual averages since 2012–13 (when the engagement indicators were established). This includes equal to or greater than 9.6 million in-person visits; equal to or greater than 6.39 per cent of objects accessible online; and equal to or greater than 42.7 million website visits. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to maintain engagement in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'We have budgeted $2.318 billion from 2019–20 to 2022–23 for Australia's national cultural institutions', with a footnote that reads: 'Budget figures for national cultural institutions include $62 million for the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House (MoAD). There are plans for MoAD to move from our portfolio to Prime Minister and Cabinet in the first half of 2019–20.' The extra explanatory information continues to read: 'These institutions directly promote inclusive access to Australia's rich cultural and creative heritage and develop our diverse creative practitioners'.

Measure 18 is an assessment of the impact of our programs to support inclusion of regional, rural and remote Australians, and people with disability. It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved.  Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our programs to support inclusiveness across Australia's regional areas include the Regional Arts Fund, Festivals Australia and Visions of Australia. We are a partner in the National Arts and Disability Strategy. Through the strategy, we work to facilitate access and participation to the arts by people with disability.'

Growth

This table includes measure numbers 19 and 20. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Growth'. 
Measure 19 is GDP contribution by the creative and cultural sectors, including: overall contribution, contribution of broadcasting, electronic or digital media and film, and contribution of music composition and publishing. It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is, in 2017–18 for overall contribution to be equal to or greater than 111.713 billion dollars, for broadcasting, electronic or digital media and film GDP contribution to be equal to or greater than 9.707 billion dollars and for music composition and publishing contribution to GDP to be equal to or greater than 148 million dollars. A note explains that 2017–18 data is expected to be the most current available for 2019–20 reporting. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for GDP contribution to continue to grow in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'In reporting on GDP and employment for the creative and cultural sectors, we include activities connected with the arts, media, heritage, design, fashion, and information technology. Between 2008–09 and 2016–17, cultural and creative activity in Australia grew to 111.713 billion dollars, an increase of 25.757 billion dollars or 30per cent. This measure demonstrates whether we are providing an environment which adequately supports the cultural and creative sectors to enable economic growth and benefit Australia's economy.'

Measure 20 is philanthropic funding to the creative and cultural sectors, including: estimated private sector support to the arts, and to organisations listed on the Register of Cultural Organisations. A footnote explains that the Register of Cultural Organisations is a list of organisations that can receive tax deductible gifts. (Public art galleries, museums and libraries are generally not included on the register because they are approved by the Australian Taxation Office under another deductible gift recipient category). The measure is tagged as activity related to Arts and Content.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is, equal to or greater than 300 million dollars in estimated private sector support to the arts in 2018–19, and equal to or greater than 100 million dollars donations to organisations listed on the Register of Cultural Organisations in 2018–19. A note explains that 2018–19 data is expected to be the most current available for 2019–20 reporting.  Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for philanthropic funding to continue to grow in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Philanthropy and corporate sponsorship play an essential role in the sustainability of Australia's creative and cultural sectors. This measure provides insight into the level of funding provided through these avenues.'

Developing, protecting and promoting Australian culture

This table includes measure numbers 21 and 22. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Developing, protecting and promoting Australian culture'. 
Measure 21 is the number of students successfully completing courses at national elite performing arts training organisations. It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is equal to or greater than 800 in 2019 and the same for the forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'With our support, the national elite performing arts training organisations provide Australia's most talented performing artists with the opportunity to excel in their chosen fields, and support the development of vibrant performance industries. We have budgeted 106.3 million dollars from 2019–20 to 2022–23 to support the seven national elite performing arts training organisations.  They are listed as: Australian Ballet School, Australian National Academy of Music; Australian Youth Orchestra; Flying Fruit Fly Circus; National Aboriginal and Islander Skills Development Association (NAISDA) Dance College; National Institute of Circus Arts and National Institute of Dramatic Art'.

Measure 21 is an assessment of the impact of our programs on supporting, preserving and celebrating: Indigenous languages, arts and culture and, Australian creativity and cultural engagement internationally. It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for positive results to be achieved. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23are to continue to achieve positive results in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our programs to support, preserve and celebrate Indigenous languages, arts and culture are the Indigenous Languages and Arts program, the Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support program, and Indigenous repatriation. We support Australian creativity and cultural engagement internationally in a variety of ways, including through cultural exchanges, work with the national collecting institutes, and work to support the Australian film industry.'

 

Protecting and promoting Australian content

This table includes measure numbers 23 and 24. The measures are effectiveness measures and are grouped under the topic 'Protecting and promoting Australian content'.
Measure 23 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the content regulatory framework for classification, Australian content and copyright. It is tagged as activity related to Content. The 2019–20 target for this measure is for reporting in 2019–20 to show positive results. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for reporting to continue to show positive results in forward years. Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Our content regulatory framework for classification, Australian content and copyright is integral to supporting growth and inclusiveness in Australia's creative sector and to protecting and promoting Australian content.'

Measure 24 is an assessment of whether the media regulatory framework is fit for purpose. It is tagged as activity related to Content. The 2019–20 target for this measure is for reporting in 2019–20 to show positive results. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for reporting to continue to show positive results in forward years. Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'We regularly review the media regulatory framework, including to ensure an appropriate balance between supporting industry sustainability and providing protections for the Australian community.'

Efficiency

This table includes measure numbers 25, 26 and 27. The measures are program resourcing (input), output and efficiency measures and are grouped under the topic 'Efficiency'.
Measure 25 is expenses for arts and cultural development (program 2.1).
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for 2019–20 expenses to be within 5% of published budget figures. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for expenses in forward years to be within 5% of published budget figures.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'Budget figures are forecast in the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and, if required, updated in the Mid Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) and Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (PAES). Funds to the national broadcasters (the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the Special Broadcasting Services Corporation) are paid under program 1.1 (measure 13, connectivity purpose), but the work of the broadcasters is also relevant to achieving this purpose.'

Measure 26 is an assessment of the effectiveness of the department's oversight of arts and cultural portfolio entities. It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for oversight to be effective in 2019–20. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are that oversight is effective in forward years.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'The operation of our portfolio entities is vital to achieving purpose efficiently. We determine whether we are providing effective oversight of our portfolio entities by assessing whether we have undertaken activities appropriate to each entity. Our oversight activities focus on: entity corporate planning and annual reporting, Budget and operational funding; advising our Minister on governance arrangements, including Board appointments and operational policy settings.'

Measure 27 is an assessment of whether program 2.1 administered items are delivered efficiently: It is tagged as activity related to Arts.
The 2019–20 target for this measure is for administered items to be delivered on time and on budget in 2019–20, indicating efficient delivery. Forward targets for 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23 are for administered items to continue to be delivered on time and on budget, indicating efficient delivery.
Extra explanatory information about the measure reads: 'The efficient delivery of our administered items is important to ensuring we remain sustainable over time.'

Risk oversight and management

Our risk management framework

Our risk management framework facilitates a culture that promotes an open and proactive approach to managing risk. Our systems of risk oversight, management and internal controls are in accordance with section 16 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy.

The Secretary has issued a risk statement, which encourages all staff to actively engage with risk. This involves anticipating emerging risks, performing risk assessments, treating risks and making prudent risk-taking decisions when delivering activities. We recognise that informed risk-taking can facilitate smarter, more efficient processes and services.

Our Chief Risk Officer oversees actions to:

  • develop and maintain capability in risk management
  • effectively and efficiently manage risk
  • encourage and build a positive risk culture

We have integrated risk management with our business planning processes and our purposes set the context for risk management. We've sought to ensure that high-priority risks influence business planning, and their treatments are integrated into business plans.

Through business planning and review processes, our Senior Executive provide support to the Secretary in the strategic management of the department's risks, including shared risk. Our Senior Executive also monitor and report on risk to the Audit and Risk, and the Finance, Human Resources and Risk committees. Our framework requires all employees complete basic online risk management training and they are encouraged to undertake Comcover risk training.

We periodically assess our risk culture through employee surveys—we last surveyed staff in November 2017 and we are planning for further surveys over the next four years.

Mitigating our strategic risks

Engaging with our strategic risks is fundamental to providing an environment in which all Australians can access and benefit from communications services, creative experiences and culture. We have identified five strategic risks, which are interrelated and align to our purposes.

Strategic risk Mitigating strategies
  1. We fail to provide an accessible and beneficial environment for communications services, creative experiences and culture

We monitor relevant market and sector developments, and provide early advice to government on major risks, opportunities and relevant policy options in response.

We design regulatory and market interventions to be technology neutral, so they do not differentiate between the underlying network or device used to deliver or receive the service or experience.

  1. Our interaction with stakeholders and consumers is inadequate

We have a stakeholder engagement framework which recognises that engaging widely helps us to provide authoritative advice. We actively seek diverse views on portfolio issues and report on these views as required.

In addition, we use existing relationships, forums and other mechanisms to seek feedback on perceptions of the quality of our outreach activities.

  1. Our focus and resources are not aligned to our policy, program, or regulation activities

Our business planning and budgeting process enables Executive oversight of the delivery of departmental and portfolio activities.

We use agile work practices and deploy taskforces and short-term project teams to bring necessary expertise and resourcing to urgent and strategic priorities. In addition, we:

  • undertake management-initiated reviews
  • use an internal audit capacity
  • research economic drivers and international approaches which inform improved policy and program delivery
  1. Our policy advice is sub-optimal as it is not forward looking and strategic

Our business planning process involves regular environmental and horizon scanning, and emerging strategic issues are discussed in Executive forums.

  1. We do not have the capability or capacity to achieve our purposes

Refer to the capability section of this plan (below).

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Capability: our strategic vision, key strategies and plans for achieving our purposes

Over the four years covered by this Corporate Plan, we will focus on building employee understanding of our new overarching strategic vision and develop a workforce plan to build on our capabilities under our vision:

1

to be the pre-eminent national entity for communications
policy, planning, investment and research

2 to be outstanding program managers
3 to be an effective and accountable leader on
telecommunications, broadcasting and digital regulation
4 to foster, promote and preserve Australian content and creativity
domestically and abroad on a variety of platforms
5 to have a view on the right outcome
6 to foster an inclusive, high-performing workplace

Workforce planning

In 2018–19, we developed a three-year workforce plan to enable us to plan and be prepared for the workforce of the future. We identified four strategies to address our findings:

  • build our capacity to meet changing business priorities
  • improving our knowledge sharing and retention
  • enhancing our management capability
  • enhancing our workforce skills and capability

In 2019–20, we will commence implementing our workforce plan. We will continue to identify ways of developing our workforce in line with our learning and development and recruitment and attraction strategies.

Operational plans have been developed that include actions for each division to address workforce gaps. These plans aim to ensure we are able to deliver against environmental pressures and have a workforce with the right mix of people, knowledge, skills and behaviours. These operational plans will be reviewed as part of the division's business plan reviews and progress reported regularly to the Executive.

Learning and Development Strategy

In the first half of 2019–20, we will implement a revised Learning and Development Strategy to respond to the gaps between current and future workforce and risks.

The strategy will emphasise:

  • the changing needs of learners
  • learning through on-the-job experiences and each other
  • upskilling of core public sector skills
  • enhancing our subject matter expertise and our contribution to whole-of-government policy
  • the role of the manager in supporting learning for their staff
  • enabling our people to respond in a rapidly changing environment

The strategy will define a fit-for-purpose model for learning in our department, and identify actions over the next three years to embed the model, enhance our learning culture, and build the current and future workforce capability needs.

Across all levels we will need employees who understand the industries we work with and who meaningfully engage with stakeholders, build trust, credibility and influence outcomes. We will need creative thinkers who collaborate effectively, proactively offer innovative solutions and continually adapt to changes in our environment.

Recruitment and Attraction Strategy

In early 2019–20, we will be implementing a Recruitment and Attraction Strategy to ensure we recruit the right people with the skills and attributes to allow for delivery of our purposes now and into the future. This strategy will recognise the importance of a workforce that is capable, diverse, structured and engaged, and our recruitment processes will ensure sound evidence based decision making combined with value, respect and support for our diverse and inclusive workplace.

The strategy will also enhance coordination, planning and targeting of our resources to maximise effectiveness and value for money in recruitment activities. The aims and objectives of the strategy will evolve and will be reviewed annually to meet our workforce priorities.

Information and communications technology (ICT)

Our current ICT Strategic Plan is for the period 2018 to 2022. It aligns with this corporate plan, our internal business plans, and whole of government strategies (see below) while leveraging advances within the wider technology environment. The ICT strategic plan is built on five core strategic directions:

  • Focus on business value
    We will focus on creating, building and maintaining business value for the department by prioritising, defining and selecting technology services.
  • Leverage data and information
    Making information, regardless of source, easy to discover and accessible.
  • Prepare for disruption
    Selecting and designing IT with the understanding that the functions they support could be reengineered, removed or relocated at any time.
  • Deliver efficiently
    Delivering better, more innovative and intuitive technology faster and cheaper than ever before.
  • Align to whole of government strategies
    Aligning to whole of government strategies that exist across a range of IT functions and services.

Sustainable development goals

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development apply to all nations. To implement the agenda, governments worldwide are expected to:

  • take ownership and establish national frameworks for the achievement of 17 identified sustainable development goals
  • mobilise their efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change
  • ensure that no one is left behind

We are a supporting agency for:

  • goal 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation
  • goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

In terms of these goals, Australia has long-standing arrangements to provide universal access to telephony, and has encouraged the development and uptake of the internet and high speed broadband. The NBN is on track to provide all Australian premises with access to affordable, high-speed next-generation broadband by 2020. This will provide enhanced connectivity and flow-on benefits for regional and remote areas. In light of the NBN's rollout, the government is developing options for a new Universal Service Guarantee to provide all Australian premises, regardless of location, with access to both voice and broadband services. Initiatives such as the Mobile Black Spot Program and Regional Connectivity Program, are delivering new and improved telecommunications infrastructure and connectivity across Australia. In partnership with industry, state and territory and local governments, these programs focus on areas where commercial investment alone is not sustainable.

Australia is home to diverse cultures. Our vibrant creative and cultural sector contributes to fostering inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and innovative cities and human settlements. Creativity is key to innovation, driving sustainability and prosperity. We support a broad range of activities that encourage a sustainable, innovative creative sector and the protection, preservation and promotion of Australian culture.

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Performance measures: additional information

For each of our performance measures, we've included in the table below the previous results (as reported in 2018–19) and the method we will use to calculate the results in 2019–20.

Connectivity

Measure (2019–20) Previous result
(2018–19)
Method to calculate result
Enabling all Australians to connect to effective communications services
  1. Percentage of Universal Service Obligation targets met by Telstra and Community Service Obligations met by Australia Post
100% in 2018–19 Analysis of reporting from Telstra and Australia Post
  1. Percentage of population with access to mobile coverage
    (We are replacing this measure from 2020–21 with the percentage of new and improved mobile coverage delivered under the Mobile Black Spots Program (measure 3), which is more closely aligned with the success of the program itself.)
>99% in 2018–19 Analysis of reporting by mobile network operators
  1. Percentage of new and improved mobile coverage delivered under the Mobile Black Spots Program
New measure Analysis of program contracts and asset completion reports to compare contracted coverage with delivered coverage across the program
  1. Premises with high-speed NBN broadband access
86% (which is 9.9 million premises) at 30 June 2019 (including 95% in regional areas)
(In the 2018–19 Portfolio Budget Statements, the measure was for the percentage of premises.  In 2019–20, we will instead measure the number of premises, to align with how NBN Co will measure its results.)
Analysis of NBN Co rollout reporting
  1. Minimum fixed broadband download speeds available to Australian premises
Not applicable—First results expected in 2020 From 2020–21, analysis of NBN Co reporting
  1. Assessment of telecommunications and postal services complaints data
Positive results achieved in 2018–19 Analysis of reporting from the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman and the ACMA on telecommunications complaints and reporting form the Postal Industry Ombudsman
Inclusiveness
  1. Assessment of affordability of telecommunications services (mobile and fixed) on offer
Price changes for typical mobile and fixed bundles over 2018–19 showed positive results for most Australians Analysis of reporting from the ACCC and of results from affordability indexes tracked in our Bureau of Communications and the Arts Research, based on Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) data
  1. Impact of our programs on improving connectivity for people with disability
We maintained the impact of our programs in 2018–19 Analysis of National Relay Service provider reporting; analysis of ACMA reporting on compliance by free-to-air television broadcasters on captioning compliance.
  1. Assessment of the effectiveness of the digital safety regulatory framework
Positive results achieved in 2018–19 Analysis of reporting by the ACMA on illegal offshore gambling websites; breaches of rules for gambling promotions during live sporting events; data from the Office of the eSafety Commissioner; and results from the National eSafety Survey
Sustainable economic growth
  1. Percentage of ready to connect premises in fixed line areas that have taken up an NBN service
56% in 2018–19 Analysis of NBN Co reporting
  1. Assessment of the effectiveness of the department's international engagement on post and spectrum outcomes
Positive results achieved in 2018–19 Analysis of results achieved
  1. GDP contribution enabled by the communications sector
$766 billion in 2016–17 Analysis of ABS data by our Bureau of Communications and the Arts Research
  1. Investment as a proportion of output in the communications sector
50.7% in 2017–18 Analysis of ABS data by our Bureau of Communications and the Arts Research
Efficiency
  1. Expenses for digital technologies and communications services (program 1.1)
Calculation of 2018–19 result not final at time of corporate plan publication

The 2017–18 result was $1.906 billion

Analysis of financial statements (audited by the ANAO)
  1. Assessment of the effectiveness of the department's oversight of communications portfolio entities
Our oversight was

effective in 2018–19

Analysis of oversight actions required and performed for each entity
  1. Assessment of whether program 1.1 administered items are delivered efficiently
We delivered 13 of 17 program 1.1 administered items on time and on budget in 2018–19 For each administered item, analysis and comparison between projected and actual milestones and budget

Creativity and culture

Measure 2018–19 result Method to calculate result
Inclusiveness and access
  1. Engagement with the national cultural institutions, indicated through:
  1. number of in-person visits to engage with national collecting institutions (including on- and off-site visits)
  2. percentage of objects in national collections accessible online
  3. number of web visits to the national cultural institutions
In 2018–19:
  1. 10.6 million
  2. 10.7%
  3. 49.0 million
Analysis of reporting from the national cultural institutions
  1. Assessment of the impact of our activities to support inclusion of: 2020–21
  1. regional, rural and remote Australians
  2. people with disability
We achieved positive results in 2018–19 Analysis of regional grant program roll-out; analysis of advance of the National Arts and Disability Strategy
Growth
  1. GDP contribution by the creative and cultural sectors, including:
  1. overall contribution
  2. contribution of broadcasting, electronic or digital media and film
  3. contribution of music composition and publishing
In 2016–17:
  1. $111.713 billion
  2. $9.707 billion
  3. $148 million
Analysis of ABS data by our Bureau of Communications and the Arts Research
  1. Philanthropic funding to the creative and cultural sectors, including:
  1. estimated private sector support to the arts
  2. to organisations on the Register of Cultural Organisations
In 2017–18:
  1. $319.1 million
  2. $135.8 million
Analysis of ABS data by our Bureau of Communications and the Arts Research; analysis of reporting by ROCO-listed organisations
Developing, protecting and promoting Australian culture
  1. Number of students successfully completing courses at national elite performing arts training organisations
1056 in 2018 Analysis of reporting by the arts training organisations
  1. Assessment of the impact of our activities on supporting, preserving and celebrating:
  1. Indigenous languages, arts and culture
  2. Australian creativity and cultural engagement internationally
We achieved positive results in 2018–19 Analysis of a range of resources on Indigenous visual arts, Indigenous languages, Indigenous repatriation and international cultural engagement
Protecting and promoting Australian content
  1. Assessment of the effectiveness of the content regulatory framework for classification, Australian content and copyright
We achieved positive results in 2018–19 Analysis of reporting on decisions by the Classification Board and the Classification Review Board; analysis of ACMA reporting on content compliance; analysis of reporting by copyright collecting societies and Australian Copyright Council; analysis of data from the annual Consumer Survey on Online Copyright Infringement.
  1. Assessment of whether the media regulatory framework is fit for purpose
We achieved positive results in 2018–19 Analysis of reporting by the ACMA on media audiences, advertising trends and broadcasting complaints, and reporting by ABC and SBS on audience metrics
Efficiency
  1. Expenses for arts and cultural development (program 2.1)
Calculation of 2018–19 result not final at time of corporate plan publication

The 2017–18 result was $676.7 million

Analysis of financial statements (audited by the ANAO)
  1. Assessment of the effectiveness of the department's oversight of arts and cultural portfolio entities
Our oversight was effective in 2018–19 Analysis of oversight actions required and performed for each entity
  1. Assessment of whether program 2.1 administered items are delivered efficiently
We delivered all program 2.1 administered items on time and on budget in 2018–19, indicating efficient delivery For each administered item, analysis and comparison between projected and actual milestones and budget

 

Compliance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

Item Topic Matters to be included Included in
1 Introduction

The following:

a statement that the plan is prepared for section 35(1)(b) of the Act
the reporting period for which the plan is prepared
the reporting periods covered by the plan

Copyright page
2 Purposes The purposes of the entity Our role and purposes
3 Environment The environment in which the entity will operate for each reporting period covered by the plan Operating environment
4 Performance

For each reporting period covered by the plan, a summary of:

how the entity will achieve the entity's purposes

how any subsidiary of the entity will contribute to achieving the entity's purposes*

how the entity's performance will be measured and assessed in achieving the entity's purposes, including any measures, targets and assessments that will be used to measure and assess the entity's performance for the purposes of preparing the entity's annual performance statements

How we will measure our achievement
5 Capability The key strategies and plans that the entity will implement in each reporting period covered by the plan to achieve the entity's purposes Capability: our strategic vision, key strategies and plans for achieving our purposes
6 Risk oversight and management A summary of the risk oversight and management systems of the entity for each reporting period covered by the plan (including any measures that will be implemented to ensure compliance with the finance law). Risk oversight and management

* We don't have any subsidiaries.

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