The national broadband network will give all Australians access to very fast broadband over fixed lines, wireless or via satellite.

The national broadband network (nbn) will give all Australians access to very fast broadband using a mix of technologies.

Who can get broadband now?

It depends where you live. Some people can access a fixed-line network (copper wire or cable), some people can access wireless networks, and some will need to use the nbn satellite:

Reviewing the nbn and industry regulatory arrangements

The Australian Government plans to give all Australians access to high-speed broadband. Reviews of the nbn have suggested how it could be done better and the appropriate regulatory framework to promote competition.

The Government commissioned the Vertigan review (led by Dr Michael Vertigan AC) which provided three separate reports in 2014. 

The Government’s response to the Vertigan review was released in December 2014.

The Government examined the nbn project as a whole via a strategic review of nbn and investigated the state of broadband availability and quality across the country to help guide the nbn rollout.

The Government also examined the public policy processes that led to the nbn project commencing.

Senate Select Committee on the national broadband network

The Senate established a Select Committee on the national broadband network to inquire into and report on the government’s reviews and governance of NBN Co Limited. The Committee tabled a second interim report on 19 March 2015 making five recommendations.

The Government responded on 19 June 2015 

No double up—the adequately served policy

Some parts of Australia already have fibre networks with high-speed broadband services. The Minister granted some of these networks ‘adequately served’ status.

The Australian Government has decided that nbn should not build another fibre network over the top of any existing adequately served networks in residential areas. The only exception will be if it’s too expensive or too hard to go around or past an existing network rather than just build over it.

There are 45 networks in residential estates that the Minister has granted adequately served status. The four carriers supplying these areas agreed to be the ‘infrastructure provider of last resort': they must offer a connection to all premises in the nominated network areas on either a wholesale or retail basis. Households can still choose their own retail service provider.


Infrastructure Group
Department of Communications
GPO Box 2154 Canberra ACT 2601