Employment has grown less than the overall economy

This is a bar chart and line chart. The left hand side y axis shows average employment (thousands of persons). The right hand side y axis shows the average employment growth rate (per cent) and the x axis shows time between 1995–96 and 2015–16. Shows that employment in the communications sector peaked in 2006−07 and has declined since then. In 2015−16, communications sector employment averaged around 209,000 persons.

Note: Excludes post.

Source: ABS 6291.0.55.003 – Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, Aug 2016, Table 6; BCR calculations.

Data link: Employment has grown less than the overall economy

Employment in the communications sector peaked in 2006−07 and has declined since then. Over the decade from 2005−06 to 2015−16, the average annual rate of decline in employment was 1.3 per cent. In contrast, employment across the whole economy averaged growth of 1.8 per cent annually. In 2015−16, communications sector employment averaged around 209,000 persons.

Less underemployment than the rest of the economy

This is a line chart. The y axis is underemployment (per cent) and the x axis is time from 1996 to 2016. Shows that underemployment in the communications sector has consistently remained below the average for all industries on a quarterly basis since the August quarter of 1996. While the rate for the communications sector is more volatile than the average for all industries, its movement tends to track the trend for all industries. In the August quarter 2016, underemployment in the communications sector was 6.6 percent per cent, which is significantly lower than the average for all industries of 9.1 per cent.

Note: Excludes post.

Source: ABS 6291.0.55.003 – Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, Aug 2016, Table 19; BCR calculations.

Data link: Less underemployment than the rest of the economy

Underemployment in the communications sector has consistently remained below the average for all industries on a quarterly basis since August 1996. While the rate for the communications sector is more volatile than the average for all industries, its movement tends to track the trend for all industries. In the August quarter of 2016, underemployment in the communications sector was 6.6 percent, which is significantly lower than the average for all industries of 9.1 per cent.

Output per employed person varies across subsectors

This is a bar chart. The y axis shows value added per full time equivalent (FTE) employed person ($'000). The x axis shows the time from 2006–07 to 2012–13. Shows that the internet services providers, internet publishing and broadcasting, websearch portals and data processing subsector has the highest output per employed person and the largest growth in this between 2006–07 and 2012–13. It is capital intensive and such subsectors tend to have higher total output in the communications sector.

Note: Includes post.

Source: ABS 5209.0.55.001 – Australian National Accounts: Input-Output Tables, 2012–13, Table 5, Table 20; BCR calculations.

Data link: Output per employed person varies across subsectors

The internet services providers, internet publishing and broadcasting, websearch portals and data processing subsector has the highest output per employed person and the largest growth in this between 2006–07 and 2012–13. It is capital intensive and such subsectors tend to have higher total output in the communications sector.

With very high value added in some subsectors

This is a bar chart. The y axis shows the breakdown for each subsector (telecommunications services; postal and courier pick-up and delivery service; publishing (except Internet and music publishing)  broadcasting (except internet); motion picture and sound recording; library and other information services; internet service providers, internet publishing and broadcasting, websearch portals and data processing) for valued added; value added per employed person and total employed persons (FTE). The x axis show the dollar amount in $'000 from 0 to 500. The value added per person is significantly greater for Internet Service Providers, Internet publishing and broadcasting, websearch portals and data processing than any of the other subsectors.

Note: Includes post.

Source: ABS 5209.0.55.001 – Australian National Accounts: Input-Output Tables, 2012–13, Table 5, Table 20; BCR calculations.

Data link: With very high value added in some subsectors

A further breakdown of the distribution of employment and output in the sector in 2012–13 show the very high value added per employed person in the internet service providers, internet publishing and broadcasting, websearch portals and data processing subsector. However, in 2012–13, the telecommunications service subsector was the largest employer in the communications sector, and had the highest value added overall in terms of dollar value.

Jobs are concentrated in the largest states

This is a bar chart. The y axis shows employment ('000) from 0 to 70. The x axis shows the breakdown by states and territories (NSW, Vic, Qld, SA, WA, Tas, NT and ACT) comparing metro and regional numbers for each state/territory. Shows NSW metro has the largest number of jobs in the communications sector.

Note: Excludes post. All of NT classified as regional. All of ACT classified as metro.

Source: ABS 6291.0.55.003 – Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, Aug 2016, Table EQ03; BCR calculations.

Data link: Jobs are concentrated in the largest states

Communications sector jobs are concentrated in the largest states.

Wages are higher than average

This is a bar chart and a line chart. The y axis shows average weekly earnings ($) from 0 to 1800. The x axis shows time from May 1996 to May 2016. The bars represent the communications sector. The line shows all industries. The chart shows that the communications sector has higher average weekly earnings than other industries over the past two decades.

Note: Excludes post.

Source: ABS 6302.0 – Average Weekly Earnings, Australia, May 2016, Table 10i – Total Earnings.

Data link: Wages are higher than average

Trends in average weekly earnings in the communications sector show that they have outstripped those for the broader economy over the past two decades. Between November 2015 and May 2016, average communications sector wages increased by $78.90, compared to the average for all industries of $15.20.

Output per hour worked is growing

This is a bar chart and a line chart. The y axis shows industry value added per worked index from 0 to 120 hours, with 2014–15 = 100. The x axis shows years from 1995–96 to 2015–16. The bar chart shows a comparison between transport, postal and warehousing, and communications sectors for each year between 1995–96 and 2015–16. The line chart shows all industries over the time period of 1995–96 and 2015–16.

Note: Communications excludes post (shown separately).

Source: ABS 5204.0 – Australian System of National Accounts, 2015–16, Table 15.

Data link: Output per hour worked is growing

Growth in the communications sector’s output per hour worked had historically been below both the national average and that for the whole of the transport post and warehousing sector. However, it has accelerated in recent years, overtaking both transport and the national average in 2013−14. In 2015−16, output per hour worked in the communications sector increased by 8.9 per cent.

The workforce tends to be younger

This is a line chart. The y axis shows percentage from 0 per cent to 35 per cent of workers aged 45 years and over. The y axis shows time from 1996 to 2016. Shows that over the years from 1996 to 2016, communication sector workers are younger than those in other industries on average. ).

Note: Excludes post.

Source: ABS 6291.0.55.003 – Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, Aug 2016, Table EQ12; BCR calculations.

Data link: The workforce tends to be younger

Communications sector workers are generally younger than those in other industries, but are still part of the overall trend towards an ageing workforce. In the August quarter of 2016, 33 per cent of communications sector workers were aged 45 years and over, compared with the average of 40 per cent.

And highly educated

This is a bar chart. The y axis shows the proportion with highest qualification relevant to their industry/job (per cent). The x axis shows 2011 and 2015. Shows 57 per cent in communications sector and 52 per cent for all industries in 2011 compared with 59 per cent in communications sector in and 55 per cent in all industries in 2015.

Note: Excludes post.

Source: ABS 4235.0 – Qualifications and Work, Australia, 2015, Table 6; ABS 4235.0 – Learning And Work, Australia, 2010–11, Table 10.

Data link: And highly educated

The communications sector is highly educated. In 2015, 59 per cent of employees in the communications sector said their highest qualification was relevant to their industry or job which exceeded the 55 per cent for all industries.