'CTC' or 'Check the Classification' allows advertising for upcoming releases to start well before they are classified in Australia—sometimes even before they have finished making the film or game.

4 May 2016

Why CTC?

Read a great film review lately and can't wait to see it? Or have the kids been raving about an up-coming video game for what seems like ages? The anticipation of a new release is certainly all part of the fun, and distributors and marketing companies know all about it. It's their job to let you know what's coming up in the film and gaming world well in advance of the launch. Sometimes release dates for Australia can lag behind the rest of the world, so for us there may be even more of a wait. In the meantime…

'CTC' or 'Check the Classification' allows advertising for upcoming releases to start well before they are classified in Australia—sometimes even before they have finished making the film or game. The film or game being advertised in a trailer must be assessed and chosen to be appropriate for the audience. Specially trained assessors consider many factors such as the film or game's intended audience demographic, subject matter and storyline, and importantly, how much sex, violence, nudity, drugs and coarse language is expected to be in the final product. The upcoming release has to be considered likely to have content at the same or a lower classification level than the feature film or game you are watching. So if you are watching a PG film with the kids, you won't be seeing ads for the latest Tarantino movie.

Once classified by the Classification Board, advertising for the film or game, should then display the classification given to it.

'Check the Classification' (or 'CTC' for short) on advertising for an upcoming release, is a reminder to everyone to check what the classification is before buying that game or selecting a movie. You can check the classification of a title on the National Classification Database at www.classification.gov.au.

Classifications are your resource to make informed decisions about what you and your children see and play.