The survey received more than 2400 responses which show the number of Australians consuming online content has increased since 2015. Australians are also consuming online content differently—streaming more, and downloading less. The results also show that there has been an increase in the consumption of lawful content across music, movies, video games and TV programs collectively.

7 August 2018

The results of the 2018 online copyright infringement survey are now available.

The survey received more than 2400 responses which show the number of Australians consuming online content has increased since 2015. Australians are also consuming online content differently—streaming more, and downloading less. The results also show that there has been an increase in the consumption of lawful content across music, movies, video games and TV programs collectively.

 Downloading up 1% for music, down 6% for video games, down 5% for movies, down 2% for TV. Streaming up 5% for music, down 1% for video games, up 9% for movies, up 9% for TV.

Frequency of digital content consumption. In 2015, 57% of respondents said they consumed 100% lawful content. In 2016, 63% of respondents said they consumed 100% lawful content. In 2017, 62% of respondents said they consumed 100% lawful content. In 2018, 67% of respondents said they consumed 100% lawful content.

Australian consumers are willing to pay more for their content, with the average quarterly spend on digital purchases and subscriptions on the rise.

Average consumer quarterly spend. Consumer spend<br />
Spend on subscriptions, comparing 2017 results to 2018. Music $15.90 down to $11.17; Movies $8.30 up to $10.88; TV $8.60 up to $11.00. Spend on individual digital purchases, comparing 2017 results to 2018. Music $8.10 down to $6.60; Movies $3.60 up to $4.00; TV $4.50 up to $6.30; Video games $8.80 up to $10.31.

Consistent with results from previous years, the 2018 results show quality, convenience and price are the key differentiating factors which motivate consumers to use paid services rather than consume unlawful content.

The online copyright infringement survey was first conducted in 2015 and in 2018 was conducted by Indigenous Professional Services (IPS). It seeks to understand Australian consumption trends across music, movies, video games and TV programs, and the attitudes that drive copyright infringement behaviour for this content.

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