We have released the results of the 2017 online copyright infringement survey, showing Australians are embracing streaming services and are more willing to pay for online content.

7 November 2017

We have released the results of the 2017 online copyright infringement survey, showing Australians are embracing streaming services and are more willing to pay for online content.

While the proportion of Australian internet users accessing unlawful content online is similar to 2016 levels, there has been an almost 10 per cent increase in Australians paying for online content since 2015.

For consumers that streamed or accessed, downloaded, or shared content, in 2017, 45 per cent consumed TV programmes, 44 per cent consumed music, 39 per cent consumed movies and 18 per cent consumed video games. In 2016, 42 per cent consumed TV programmes, 39 per cent consumed music, 33 per cent consumed movies and 16 per cent consumed video games. In 2015 38 per cent consumed TV programmes, 42 per cent consumed music, 29 per cent consumed movies and 16 per cent consumed video games.   For all internet users who consumed content including; video games, movies, music and TV programmes, 53 per cent paid for content in 2015, 59 per cent paid for content in 2016 and 62 per cent paid for content in 2017. For all internet users who consumed video games, 62 per cent paid for video games in 2015, 62 per cent paid for video games in 2016 and 69 per cent paid for video games in 2017. For all internet users who consumed movies, 42 per cent paid for movies in 2015, 61 per cent paid for movies in 2016 and 65 per cent paid for movies in 2017. For all internet users who consumed music, 52 per cent paid for music in 2015, 54 per cent paid for music in 2016 and 56 per cent paid for music in 2017. For all internet users who consumed TV programmes, 24 per cent paid for TV programmes in 2015, 39 per cent paid for TV programmes in 2016 and 47 per cent paid for TV programmes in 2017.

Images sourced from Kantar Public.

The survey gives a preliminary indication that injunctions made to block pirate sites under the Government's online copyright infringement legislation have helped deter users from accessing unlawful content.

Kantar Public conducted the survey on behalf of the Department between January and March 2017, with over 2,400 people taking part. This is the third year the survey has been conducted, building a snapshot of Australians' changing attitudes to online copyright infringement since 2015.

The results indicate that 62 per cent of Australians now stream some type of digital content compared to 54 per cent in 2015. However, the findings also demonstrate that pricing and availability continue to be key factors for people consuming unlawful content.

For all internet users aged twelve and over, levels of online copyright infringement decreased from 26 percent in 2015 to 23 percent in 2016 and remained at 26 percent in 2017. For digital content consumers specifically, levels of infringement decreased from 43 percent in 2015 to 37 percent in 2016 and increased to 38 percent in 2017.

Image was sourced from Kantar Public.

In assessing the factors that would most encourage people to stop accessing unlawful content were, in 2017, 39 per cent of respondents indicated lawful services being cheaper (down from 43 percent in 2016, and consistent with 39 percent in 2015). 30 per cent of respondents indicated lawful content being more available (down from 31 percent in 2016, and 38 percent in 2015). 30 per cent of respondents indicated lawful services being more convenient / flexible (consistent with 30 percent in 2016, and up from 26 percent in 2015). 28 per cent of respondents indicated lawful services being better quality (up from 27 percent in 2016, and 22 percent in 2015). 26 per cent of respondents indicated lawful content being available as soon as it is released elsewhere (down from 35 percent in 2016, and 36 percent in 2015).

Image was sourced from Kantar Public.

Additionally, the 2017 survey shows that:

  • 62 per cent of the 31 survey participants who had encountered a blocked site when trying to download or stream unlawful content 'simply gave up'.
  • Online subscription expenditure has significantly increased since 2015 for all relevant content types.
  • Quality and price were key differentiating motivational factors for using paid services and consuming unlawful content.
  • The increasing availability of different types of online content may be resulting in consumers becoming less confident in understanding if the content they are consuming is lawful.

 sixty percent simply gave up on accessing the content; ten percent sought alternative lawful access; and ten percent sought alternative free but unlawful access.

Image was sourced from Kantar Public.

The survey is designed to understand the types of copyright material being accessed illegally across four key types of online content: music, movies, video games and TV programs. It also seeks to understand attitudes that drive copyright infringement behaviour.

Documents

Consumer Survey on Online Copyright Infringement 2017—A marketing research report

Published

Download PDF (1.93 MB) Download DOC (501.85 KB)
This report presents the main findings of the third consumer survey of online copyright infringement amongst Australians aged 12+, conducted in March 2017. Powerpoint presentation—refer to the document page for links to the powerpoint presentation. These documents have been prepared by a third party and may not meet WCAG 2.0 accessibility requirements. For an accessible copy, please contact copyright [at] communications.gov.au.